Government vs. You

Ordinarily, I’m very fussy about ensuring that only my own words come from me.  But my friends/ allies at DownsizeDC.org came up with such a neat, concise summary on how, in the words of Harry Browne, that “Government doesn’t work” (and why we need to put a leash on it), that I’m stealing sharing another’s work here:

Subject: Government vs. You

In 1871 the city of Chicago burned to the ground. There was no FEMA or large federal funding to rebuild it. Instead, the people of Chicago rebuilt their own city and in short order it soared to new heights.

In 1906, after a major earthquake, the city of San Francisco also burned down. There was no FEMA or large federal funding to rebuild it. Instead, the people of San Francisco did it themselves and the city was soon restored.

In 2005 a large part of the city of New Orleans was destroyed when a levy, designed, built, and maintained by government, proved inadequate to protect against a hurricane that was far from the worst that could have struck the city. Private citizens and businesses such as Wal-Mart rushed to the city’s aid, but were largely blocked by federal officials. FEMA and large federal funding were there to rebuild the city, but today much of New Orleans still lies in ruins.

We see the evidence all around us, where government seeks to help, harm often follows. Education, food, energy, and medical care are all areas where the government alleges it helps you, but all are areas where prices are rising faster than in other sectors.

Government doesn’t work, because government has no incentive to succeed. Instead, government prospers by failing — constantly gaining new power and resources because of the crises it creates.  

You can read the rest here.

 

 

 

 

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“Special Interest Groups,” eh?

Politicians love to throw problems upon that catchy phrase, “Special Interest Groups.”  Entrenched politicians love to point fingers of blame at the “money in politics,” and the lobbyists who …apparently …pray upon our loving, selfless and servant-natured (but somehow helpless) politicians.  It’s those lobbyists and “profit-motivated corporations” that cause all our problems, they say.

Oh come on now.  Why do we fall for this?  The most nefarious and mighty “profit-motivated” businessman (is this worse than power-mad politician?) is, without a politician, powerless against you.  Only a politician can wield force in the form of coercion, prohibitions, regulations, codes, fines, fees, licenses, prison, oppression, genocide and war.  No “special interest” has any affective power …unless, of course, it has purchased itself a politician.

Free markets are, by definition, free and completely voluntary.  There can be no coercion or force, or it’s not a free market (take that, NAFTA).  Politicians, however, ARE force.  They do nothing without at least the threat of violence.

That’s why they also bad-mouth “unregulated free markets” and invent more ways to sell advantages.

The problem isn’t “special interest groups” at all.  It’s the politicians they buy!  It’s not that money buys influence.  It’s that politicians sell it! 

Who can be an “influence peddler” except the owners and wielders of influence?

Don’t be fooled again.  Behind every serious social problem we face today, you’ll see the sneaky but unmistakable face of a politician.  The solution to every one of these problems is to remove the politician.

 

Truth in advertising?

OK, I’ve admitted it before, and I’ll ‘fess up again.  Almost all of the pictures of me out there are pretty old.  I don’t look like so much my old campaign photos anymore.  So, while this has nothing to do with constitutional Rule of Law, and in response for requests for a more recent photo, here’s what I think is a good photo of me:

I\'ve always wanted a tractor...

 

Horning for Governor FAQ:

1.  Education: The constitution mandates Common Schools, or identical, inexpensive, focused and high-quality community schools funded by only the state.  These are not some freakish and inequitable monstrosity of local, state and federal funding.  These schools are about education, which involves books; not cafeterias, buses, and expensive sports facilities.  Fitness for all kids has suffered since we now have fewer sports teams since school “consolidation,” which means fewer opportunities and outlets for most kids.  This is all terribly wrong.  Our primary schools should provide what has degraded into college-level education.  They should not be farm-teams for the pro’s, or social indoctrination centers for politicians and their campaign contributors.  It’s time to treat this seriously.  The solution?  Govern our government.

 

2.  Taxes:  I’ve been a consistent leader in tax issues, movements and protests since 1998.  I’ve always opposed property tax, and I lead the property tax protests that started in the spring and summer of 2007.  But taxation is a symptom, not a disease in itself.  Taxation is, of course, the forcibly-extracted wage of politics.  We will have it as long as we have politicians.  I wrote a paper on this subject (starting on page 17) which you can access here with a free signup.  But if we put a leash on those bad boys, our tax bite will be much, much less serious and more sustainable.  Govern government and taxes will be few, simple and small.

 

3. Gas prices: Oy vey have we been lied to about this one!  Oil company profits are a little shy of 10%, which is pretty high for them, but only about half the average profits of businesses like tobacco, publishing, software and shipping.  Taxes, however, comprise about 30% of the price of each gallon.  You tell me who’s making scandalous profit.  Next consider the regulations and 30-year moratoria imposed upon USA oil production and refinement.  I’m surprised gas isn’t more expensive.  But then look at the value of the central bank’s so-called “dollar” (which was once, before 1913, defined as a specific assay of gold/silver) – in inflation-adjusted price, gas is about the same as it was about 60 years ago!  So, our so-called “Federal Reserve” scammers and their pet politicians are robbing you; not the oil companies.  The solution?  Govern our government.  Leash our politicians to law.

 

4. Crime: I wrote a paper on this subject which you can access here with a free signup.  While I wrote it in relation to Indianapolis crime, it applies everywhere.  The bottom-line best solution to crime?  Go after the real criminals: Govern our government.

 

5. Citizen rights:  No compromises.  Should I become Governor, you will have all your state (and with enough support, federal also) rights again; no mere illusion of conditional privileges.  Rights cannot be regulated.  Either you have them or you don’t.  I am all about enforcing the restrictions on politicians that ensure your rights.

 

6. Gerrymandering: Back in the 1990’s I proposed that all districts have at least one right angle enclosing at least 40% of the district’s area.  There.  Problem solved.  But since this is a legislative issue, I’ll only suggest it again.

 

7. Death Penalty: As far as the death penalty goes, I am very, very conflicted.  I believe a just and legally-governed state has the right to kill people who are beyond rehabilitation, and who we cannot otherwise tolerate in society.  But our state isn’t just or legal at all.  I’m not so sure it ever could be (unless I win, of course J).  And since death penalties cost taxpayers more money than do truly life-term sentences, I’m generally opposed.

 

8. “Why are you running, Andy?”:  I’m running for the constitutional office of Indiana Governor because nobody else is.  I want to govern government, not you.  I aim to take the choker-collar of law off of you and put it onto politicians.  We need public servants, not tyrants.