Government ain’t no business…

Imagine if Microsoft had armed forces and was authorized to use them. Imagine if Starbucks had even one Stealth Bomber, and was allowed to use it however it sees fit.

This is what I think of when I hear a politician say “…we need to run government like a business!

I understand and appreciate the intent. Nobody is more 100% Free Market than I am. But here’s the thing: Free Market and Government are opposites. Freedom and politicians are opposites. The free market, in order to be free, means free choices…no violence allowed. And government is, no matter what we prefer to think, violence. 

Government is not pleasant words; it is policemen and jails and tanks and tasers and bombs. And these things, while always used against citizens to some degree here in America, are used against civilians more and more every single day.

Government, when it chooses to serve its proper role, uses its violence to keep Microsoft from using The Bomb on its competitors. More frequently, however, government becomes the arms dealer and power broker that decides who succeeds and who dies (literally as well as figuratively).

Politicians of course become intoxicated with this power. That’s why we have constitutions, to protect us from what politicians are all about (you know, power, corruption, slavery, genocide and war).

Of all our founders, George Mason is my favorite, with the other Antifederalists like Patrick Henry not far behind. But my favorites are not well known, and I’ll not bother to champion them so long after their death.  And I’m not at all a fan of everything that Thomas Jefferson actually did. But as I do certainly and humbly tip my hat to what he’d said (and accomplished with his words), I’ll offer up some of what just this single “founding father” said about the Rule of Law versus the Rule of Tyrants:

“(To establish republican government, it is necessary to) effect a constitution in which the will of the nation shall have an organized control over the actions of its government, and its citizens a regular protection against its oppressions.” –Thomas Jefferson to Lafayette, 1816.

Aware of the tendency of power to degenerate into abuse, the worthies of our country have secured its independence by the establishment of a Constitution and form of government for our nation, calculated to prevent as well as to correct abuse.” –Thomas Jefferson to Washington Tammany Society, 1809.

I consider the foundation of the (Federal) Constitution as laid on this ground: That “all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States or to the people.” (10th Amendment) To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specifically drawn around the powers of Congress is to take possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible of any definition.” –Thomas Jefferson: Opinion on National Bank, 1791.

Whensoever the General Government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force.” –Thomas Jefferson: Draft Kentucky Resolutions, 1798.

It (is) inconsistent with the principles of civil liberty, and contrary to the natural rights of the other members of the society, that any body of men therein should have authority to enlarge their own powers, prerogatives or emoluments without restraint.” –Thomas Jefferson: Virginia Allowance Bill, 1778. Papers 2:231

To keep in all things within the pale of our constitutional powers… (is one of) the landmarks by which we are to guide ourselves in all our proceedings.” –Thomas Jefferson: 2nd Annual Message, 1802.

Our Constitution has accordingly fixed the limits to which, and no further, our confidence may go… In questions of power, then, let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution.” –Thomas Jefferson: Draft Kentucky Resolutions, 1798.

Let the honest advocate of confidence read the Alien and Sedition Acts and say if the Constitution has not been wise in fixing limits to the government it created, and whether we should be wise in destroying those limits.” –Thomas Jefferson: Draft Kentucky Resolutions, 1798.  

Unless the mass retains sufficient control over those entrusted with the powers of their government, these will be perverted to their own oppression, and to the perpetuation of wealth and power in the individuals and their families selected for the trust. Whether our Constitution has hit on the exact degree of control necessary, is yet under experiment.” –Thomas Jefferson to M. van der Kemp, 1812.

I was in Europe when the Constitution was planned, and never saw it till after it was established. On receiving it, I wrote strongly to Mr. Madison, urging the want of provision for… an express reservation to the States of all rights not specifically granted to the Union.” –Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Priestley, 1802.

Smaller objections (I have to the new Constitution) are (the omission of) the appeals on matters of fact as well as law, and the binding of all persons, Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary, by oath to maintain that constitution.” –Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 1787.

All of our elected politicians do swear to maintain the constitutions.  In Indiana, they swear to uphold both state and federal constitutions!

Though written constitutions may be violated in moments of passion or delusion, yet they furnish a text to which those who are watchful may again rally and recall the people. They fix, too, for the people the principles of their political creed.” –Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Priestley, 1802.

Shouldn’t we read these texts again?  Isn’t it time to rally around them?

“(The purpose of a written constitution is) to bind up the several branches of government by certain laws, which, when they transgress, their acts shall become nullities; to render unnecessary an appeal to the people, or in other words a rebellion, on every infraction of their rights, on the peril that their acquiescence shall be construed into an intention to surrender those rights.” –Thomas Jefferson: Notes on Virginia Q.XIII, 1782.

Read that last quote again.  In fact, read it two more times, and then after you do that, read it again.

Then tell others to do the same.  And tell them again…

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Bad History + Status Quo = Bad Future

 If history demonstrates anything, it’s that politics has always been our deadliest abstraction. Your neighbor by himself can, at most, steal a few things or even kill a few people before somebody with a gun stops him. But call that same person a “politician” or a “king,” and he or she can, with our collective allegiance and in the name of the greater good, take everything, kill millions, oppress, enslave and wage war. Not only do these people often get away with it, but those not caught or killed in the midst of their evil are typically called heroes.

And history shows that politicians invoke such terror by an invariably repetitious, astoundingly simple modus operandi: they break laws, both written and moral – and they do it precisely to the degree and duration that we let them get away with it.

I’ll skip citing examples since I’m sure you can think of plenty from Nero to Stalin to George W Bush. George Orwell stated the obvious when he said that political language “is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable.” What’s hard to understand is why we keep falling for it.

The question at hand, now very pressing, is what do we do with our lawbreaking politicians? The answer is, typically, that we do nothing, and reap horrific consequences.

I’m not happy with that answer, yet I’ve had little luck trying to get people motivated to even ASK politicians for Rule of Law instead of Rule of Tyrants.

Remember, words like “holocaust” do not apply to even your worst neighbors. But such catastrophes are always on the To Do list of a politician, and apparently never foreseen by citizens.

…Or is there more hope than I’d imagined?

I never expected Ron Paul would connect to so many people with his “out of touch” message of liberty. I never expected a “throwback” or “fringe” candidate could raise so much money and cause so much excitement among so many. Of course I’m maddened that he’s treated so unfairly by both the media and his own party. But I had expected his candidacy to fizzle and disappear long ago under the combination of corrupt power and citizen stupor.

Are people waking up? Is now the time to reignite the torch of liberty?

I don’t know. But I don’t want to squander the opportunity, if it exists.

It’s getting awfully late in the 2008 election cycle, but since we currently have nobody at all even running for the constitutional office of Indiana Governor, there’s nothing for me to do but run for that office myself, right? 

I’m not fooling myself or anyone else. My chances don’t depend upon me, they depend upon voters. I’ve already thrown myself against that so-far intransigent brick wall many times, yet I’ll never again stoop to “pragmatic” pandering through “mainstream” electioneering (e.g., running as a Republican). That has never worked for any good purpose, and has always been a tool of evil.

So I’ll not sacrifice my job or anyone else’s job/sanity/health. I’ll delegate an awful lot (even public appearances, speaking, etc.) to others. If we can’t find enough people to spread that load, then we’ll have no shot on Election Day anyway, right?

We’ll play no games but we’ll have fun and do good work on behalf of liberty and justice. Who, among you who have an obvious interest in governed government, will join me?

Please send me your contact info, and we’ll get started. We can’t start too soon.  

“Find out just what the people will submit to and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue until they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.” – Frederick Douglass 

“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.” -Benjamin Franklin 

“A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government.” -Edward Abbey

“Give me Liberty, or give me my Money Back!” –me

 

Waste your vote, you say?

For at least as long as I’ve been reading his work, Chuck Baldwin has written strong, clear-headed and straight-to-the-root attacks on what needs to be attacked. Politics, of course. Politics needs never-ending attack. “Society,” certainly, as we have become a degraded lot. I’m always cheered to see this upright man of God attack idolatrous Christians and blindly loyal Republicans; as they are the ones above all who have no excuses for their behavior, and need a Nathan more than King David ever did.

This column is quite good also, but I’m disappointed he’s so late with its message. We really needed his influential voice on this ten years ago at the very least.

Even so, better late than never. It is indeed “…time to say it: the two major parties hold a death grip on the American people.” It is a death grip. And we must choose whether to break it, or die.

The “wasted vote” argument has always been a pathetic evasion of logic and duty. I’ve always been embarrassed for the afflicted voter who’d tell me “Of course I should vote for you if I want things to get better, but I don’t want to waste my vote!

But now that argument is beyond lame and dumb. 

Now, if you intend to vote for any major party candidate instead of an alternative, you’ve got some explaining to do.

I’ll not offer up another litany of modern woes. I’ve done that enough. The cold fact of it is that if you’ve been voting for any major party, you’ve been voting for all of our troubles, magnified, many times over, with every election cycle. The politicians you’ve hired are not the problem; you are.

Deal with it. 

Of course, if you’re not the problem, your neighbor is. And we all have to deal with that.

I say it’s time to get busy. Shake things up. Change the world while we still have one. 

I mean right now.  Get busy.

If you’re in Indianapolis, check out Sean Shepard. If you’re anywhere in Indiana, check out me.  Wherever you are in the world, look for those who oppose the entrenched powers, or check your gut, roll up your sleeves, and do it yourself.

The choice is yours, and there are no more excuses.