A Constitutional Convention Can Do …What?

Would a Constitutional Convention fix our constitutional problems?

The tiny percentage of us who’ve actually read any constitution, federal or state, know very well that all levels of our government operate in violation of these proven, fundamental, once-cherished and now-ignored laws.

So it’s no surprise that most of us sense a problem with the state of our union.  It’s similarly predictable that most of us misdiagnose the problem and then promote bad ideas as a cure.

But this problem of ungoverned government (a.k.a., anarchy) isn’t that our politicians are “out of touch.”  Far from it.  The problem is that our politicians represent us perfectly. 

We The People have completely violated “the supreme Law of the Land” at every level – federal, state, local and personal.  A constitutional convention now would only muddle matters with more laws written by lawbreakers in a society that has no respect for law. 

The real cure is to snap out of this madness, read the law and obey it as written:

The federal constitution’s tenth amendment decrees that “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”  So whatever power isn’t specifically delegated in the constitution is completely denied. 

All state constitutions say something similar.  The Indiana constitution’s Article I, Section 25 says, “No law shall be passed, the taking effect of which shall be made to depend upon any authority, except as provided in this Constitution.”  In other words, not even legislation can create authority; only constitutions do that.

No constitution was ever amended to authorize most of what governments now do to citizens.

Even the Texas Constitution, the longest and worst (due to “runaway” amendments and usurpations some claim never happened and couldn’t happen in a new constitutional convention), obviates the need of any new laws in its Article I, Sec. 29: “To guard against transgressions of the high powers herein delegated, we declare that everything in this ‘Bill of Rights’ is excepted out of the general powers of government, and shall forever remain inviolate, and all laws contrary thereto, or to the following provisions, shall be void.” 

Nullification of anything unconstitutional is already law in every state of the union. 

Let us pray that we do this soon, before somebody invokes Article 10 of the New Hampshire constitution: “…whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to reform the old, or establish a new government. The doctrine of nonresistance against arbitrary power, and oppression, is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.”

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