What he should’ve said

I’m not breaking my vow to never blog again…I’m just sayin’ that our President’s speech was too long, and all wrong.

Here’s what he (or McConnell) should’ve said:

My fellow human beings, over the past hundred years, American voters have gradually surrendered their property, initiative, freedom and security to politicians, and that was a stupid thing to do.

Now our debts and fear/aggressions, crimes and perversions have grown so big and obvious that, frankly, I’m embarrassed that you still think that you can trust politicians with your life, liberty and pursuit of health insurance.  The whole point of our constitutions was to put a leash on politics, so that real people could live by their own choice, generosity, sweat and ingenuity.  But we rob you blind, tell you we saved you from worse, and you’re still voting for this two-headed, two-faced Demorepublicrat monster.

Dang, people.

It’s by your choice that those who’ve been right all along are called “fringe,” and most accurately, “loser;” while those who’ve been wrong, or worse, deceived you intentionally, are called “expert,” “wonk,” or of course, “The Honorable so and so.”

I cannot apologize for your choices, but I am truly sorry that we politicians did what comes natural to us, and that you still have much to suffer before our mess can be made right.

I’ve already said that I’d rather be a good one-term President than a mediocre two-timer.  So whether voters have learned from our collective mistakes or not, I now intend to do what’s right.

And what’s right is to recognize that, while any fool can wield power, only the great restrain it.

My fellow Americans, I am the President who will wean you off politics.

You want somebody to care for you?  Make some friends, join a church or voluntary service association, and raise a good family.  If you can’t get people to care for you voluntarily, I’m sure not going to sqeeze taxpayers for you.

As for a financial stimulus?  I will suggest that Congress gets double-pay to just stay home and leave you the heck alone.

About terrorism…we never should’ve gone weak-kneed over zealots with exploding underpants.

I’m telling all you red-blooded game hunters out there, that as of right now, it’s open season on terrorists.  Have at ’em, but of course try not to make too many mistakes.  You plug ’em, we’ll plant ’em.

Does that scare you?  If so, then you have no idea how much suffering currently takes place, even in the homes of our soldiers; and you have no idea how much our endless wars cost you in money, social disorder, freedom, security and opportunities lost forever.

Overnight, ordinary rednecks could end, and forever scare away terrorism, at a tiny fraction of the current cost in dollars, corruption and human life; and allow us to bring our troops home.  Not just from Afghanistan and Iraq, but from all over the world.  We’d no longer flex our muscles or play nanny on foreign soil, because the world would know that we are impenetrable here at home.

As far as job creation goes?

I know economics was supposed to be two-thirds of my speech.  But government is violence, not business.  Government is more about oppression, slavery, genocide and war than anything else it may pretend to be.  It never creates.  It cannot give without first taking.  You should never have let us rob Peter to pay Paul.  Not only is it morally wrong in its essence, but you should have known that you are not Paul.

To wrap this up, let me say that I have read the Constitution that I swore to uphold against all enemies, foreign and domestic; and I now aim to do just that, as written in both black, and white.  People have fought and died for this precious contract, and I will never again let anyone in my administration treat it with anything other than respect.

Then again, it’s up to you, American voters, to hold me to that.

Thank you, and may God bless us all.

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INDIANA RESOLUTION of 2009?

OK, so this is yet another final blog.  So forgetting, for the moment, what’s likely to happen to the Great Experiment within the next ten years (when maybe we’ll be blogging on stone tablets again), here’s how I think things generally go, specifically what happened here, and what to do about it if we’ve any sense left. 

You see, it is the nature of human governments to become ungoverned and oppressive.  Our default state is sin, slavery, genocide and war, after all.  Our nations’ founders knew this and devised a limited, federal form of government with divided powers opposed by checks and balances…and they wrote down the laws in plain speech to be read, understood and obeyed without exception.

With a few notable and sometimes ghastly exceptions (hey, we’re a bad species), it worked better than anything before or since.  But as with anything good, decay was inevitable on this fallen world. 

In terms of rate of improvement (rate of increase of standard of living, leisure time and productivity; rate of reduction in working hours, disease and hunger) the USA reached its peak around 1912, started leveling off and then reversing thereafter.  I think that this is because Jim Crow and “big government” in the form of modern socialism was just then really taking hold.  But I believe the point is that previously, most Americans were simply left alone such that they could seek their own success unimpeded.

But Americans are now working longer and harder (20% longer hours with 2 weeks shorter vacations just since 1979) for less and less while the government takes more and more.

The Land of the Free now has the world’s highest percentage of citizens in prison. The Home of the Brave now has more lawsuits than all the other nations on earth combined

By September 11, 2001, we are told, it took only a handful of men armed only with box-cutters to topple our house of cards and make us fundamentally change our notions of freedom and global citizenship.  

The USA hasn’t legally declared a war since WWII.  US Rep. Henry Hyde said that the constitution is, “Inappropriate, anachronistic, it isn’t done anymore.”  So we’re now warring in clear violation of Article I, Sections 8:10, and 10:3 of our U.S. Constitution as a “humanitarian” effort to spread Freedom and the Rule of Law while we have given up those things here at home.  

Why do we tolerate this?

The signers of the Declaration of Independence believed “…All experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Yet they also insisted that governments derive “their just powers from the consent of the governed.” 

So, “whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.”

It is time to do something, certainly.  Fortunately, in this country there are precedents for peacefully reasserting the U.S. Constitution and Rule of Law. 

In response to the Alien Act and Sedition Act, the legislatures of Kentucky and Virginia passed resolutions in 1799 demanding that government keep the terms of its contract (the U.S. Constitution).

From the Virginia Resolution: “…this Assembly doth explicitly and peremptorily declare, that it views the powers of the federal government, as resulting from the compact, to which the states are parties; as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting the compact; as no further valid that they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact; and that in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them.

 

From the “plain sense” of the Constitution these men insisted that “…the Liberty of Conscience and of the Press cannot be cancelled, abridged, restrained, or modified by any authority of the United States.” 

 

This is quite opposed to the ruling by District Court Judge David Hamilton that prayer and speech in the Indiana General Assembly must be modified, restrained, abridged and cancelled.

 

The signers of the Kentucky resolution declared that “…if those who administer the general government be permitted to transgress the limits fixed by that compact,” that it would be their duty to nullify the union.

 

In other words, while the ink was still wet on the U.S. Constitution, some of our founders (notably Jefferson and Madison who helped author the Kentucky Resolution and Virginia Resolution) sensed infractions against the contract and demanded redress.

 

Just a few years later however, in 1803, a mostly harmless ruling in a minor issue became a major problem. 

 

In Marbury v. Madison, The Supreme Court under Chief Justice Marshall decreed that the Supreme Court’s power to issue writs of mandamus, as granted by the Judiciary Act of 1789, were unconstitutional.   In other words Marshall used the Constitution, as written, to restrain another branch of federal government (the heart of the case) as well as his own court.  This much was proper. 

 

And in context, it was proper for Marshall to say, as he did, that “It is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to say what the law is.”

 

Sadly, those words have been taken to mean that the Supreme Court is empowered to change the meaning of the Constitution; and that is not what the founders intended, or what Marshall meant.

 

Civil law means what it says, and judges should say so.  But the power to “interpret” law as anything other than what was intended by congress was never given to courts by the U.S. Constitution.  Only common law is determined in court; so what Marshall said would have a power grab, and probably would have been stopped…if it weren’t for the fact that Marshall himself knew better than what we’ve made of his words.

 

For he also said in that same ruling that “…the particular phraseology of the constitution of the United States confirms and strengthens the principle, supposed to be essential to all written constitutions, that a law repugnant to the constitution is void; and that courts, as well as other departments, are bound by that instrument.” 

 

The civil law of the constitution was exhaustively explained in the Federalist and Antifederalist Papers, Madison’s Diaries, letters and books written by the men that wrote the Constitution itself.  No interpretation is necessary or legal.  We can change it or obey it; nothing else is legal, and nothing else works.

 

That is, after all, the Rule of Law, right?

 

Yet with Marbury v. Madison began a long, but initially very subtle and slow train of abuses and usurpations by the judiciary that we must now correct. 

 

Because as the inevitable result of the statement, ““It is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to say what the law is” came the famous question, “It depends on what the meaning of the word ‘is’ is.

 

This is the backdrop for what I’m proposing for an Indiana Resolution.  

 

We have foolishly asked politicians for new laws, new restraints, when the whole of the problem is that politicians completely disregard law and anything like restraint.

 

Perhaps it’s too simple.  Perhaps it’s that we’ve no experience with governed government.  Whatever the case, since 1799 we have never demanded that our politicians simply obey the written law, as written.

 

So here’s what I propose:

 

Indiana Resolution

 

WHEREAS

James Madison and Thomas Jefferson understood the letter and intent of the Constitution for the United States of America;

 

These men, working on behalf of the states of Virginia and Kentucky (respectively) authored the “Virginia Resolution” and “Kentucky Resolutions” of 1798 to 1799;

 

The legislatures of the states of Virginia and Kentucky passed these resolutions less than ten years after their ratification of the Constitution for the United States of America, affirming those states’ understanding of the letter and intent of that contract;

 

That this Indiana Resolution affirms the plain sense of those resolutions insomuch as:

a. The States are the owners and defenders of federalism.

b. The Constitution for the United States of America is a contract to be obeyed as written.

c. The federal government has no legal right to exercise powers not specifically granted to it by the Constitution for the United States of America.

d. Any powers exercised outside constitutional authority are legally void, and should be allowed no force or effect.

 

RESOLVED

That the General Assembly of Indiana, having sworn or affirmed oaths to support both state and federal constitutions, does unequivocally support those contracts;

 

That the powers not unambiguously and specifically delegated to the United States federal government by the Constitution of the United States, nor prohibited by it to the states, are held by the states, and/or by the people.

 

That the states who form the union and who in compact validate the US Constitution and the federal government thus formed, being by the US Constitution both legally independent and sovereign, have the unquestionable right to judge of its infraction; and that a nullification, by those sovereignties, of all unauthorized acts done under color of that instrument, is the rightful remedy.

 

That the Governor be asked to transmit a copy of the foregoing Resolutions to the President of the United States and to the Governor of each of the other states, with a request that the same may be communicated to the Legislatures thereof; and that a copy be furnished to each of the Senators and Representatives representing this state in the Congress of the United States.

 

 

Time to bite the bullet, or take it in the gut

I’m happy that there seems to be more and more good information popping up out there.  But I’m not so happy that this effusion of information seems to be a death rattle.

Every day now I read or hear about another ungoverned-government story like this.  I’m no longer shocked, of course; I’m just deeply grieved and more than a little scared for my children.  More and more of us are asking for the chains and whips of oppression, and we’re about to get what we’ve asked for.

Not that we’ve not been punished already, of course.  Mostly since the 1970’s, our crime rates have skyrocketed such that now we’re looking at around 600 times the per-capita crime Americans/Hoosiers experienced a hundred years ago.  We have by far the world’s highest percentage of citizens in prison, and lawmakers are devising new crimes every day.  This dissolution of order is of course because we’ve flouted the constitutions that made this nation work.  Our politicians propose fixing this problem by breaking more laws and commandeering more liberties. 

That stinks.

On of our greatest orator-thinker-politicians, Frederick Douglass, wrote:

Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.”

Of course justice is denied these days.  Poverty is always enforced by politicians (In a land of plenty you can’t have poverty without politicians’ help).  Ignorance is taught in government schools and reinforced by legislation.  And has there ever been a society with so many classes and cliques?  We have an endless stream of new laws separating and opposing gay versus straight, male versus female, black versus white versus Hispanic versus Haitian versus whatever the heck we can imagine…

And everybody is robbed and degraded on behalf of somebody.  Everybody’s got hooks in everybody else.  I don’t want you to eat trans-fats because I have to pay for your healthcare.

We’ve “spread the costs” so broad and deep that we really have no idea how much healthcare, driving, food or anything else actually costs, or how to make rational decisions about resources and savings.  And so we make decisions based upon illusions.  …Taxes and subsidies, prohibitions and perks, lies and more lies all manipulated and served hot by politicians we know to be drunk with power.

This isn’t as good as it sounds.

It is time for pain, I’m afraid.  It’s either constructive destruction or total failure.

Douglass had something to say about this as well:

Those who profess to favor freedom and yet depreciate agitation, are people who want crops without plowing the ground; they want rain without thunder and lightning; they want the ocean without the roar of its many waters. The struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, or it may be both. But it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand; it never has and it never will.

One more Douglass quote…  I think it’s important to hear from this man who was once a slave:

Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.”

Can there be any doubt as to the truth of this?

For the past 90 years we have been coasting on the wealth earned by our great grandparents.  But over that time the once rebellious and self-reliant Americans have become dependent, weak and obsequiously loyal to their political idols.  You know what happens next.  Either we take difficult action and make sacrifices with grim determination and hope for a better future, or we continue our current course and wait patiently for destruction…and madness.

I pray we choose wisely. 

And may God have mercy.

Huxley Only Imagined…

Well now.  Here’s something interesting

Not only is the Orwellian title attention-grabbing in its own right (and absurd, since experience hath shewn that governments by their nature do the opposite of “save lives.”), but just read this perversity and see if you don’t get cold chills.  Just think about the ramifications – our corrupt, foolish and selfish politicians collecting and owning all DNA data from everybody born in the USA:

  • Our politicians’ record with data security (from both hacking and plain old screwups) is just awful.  Mistakes will be madeHuge ones.  The United Kingdom, our apparent role model, already screwed up with DNA samples, among other things.
  • You think “pre-existing condition” exclusions are bad now!
  • What little good could come out of such a thing is certainly outweighed by sci-fi mischief and Keystone Cops incompetence.

Oh, but it sounds so well-intended and helpful, doesn’t it?  What’s the history of that as applied to politicians?

Anyway, it’s scheduled for debate in the House of Representatives.  Nearly all reps will vote on this without having read a word of it.  They may tell a 20-something legislative aid to read it for them, but most of those starry-eyed future congresscritters haven’t lived long enough to get through a history book and they’ve never heard about such a thing as constitutional limitation of powers.

It’s up to you to tell your reps what’s what and just who they work for.  Brave New World?  It’s still your choice.

Choose wisely.

 

“Supreme Court” versus Indiana?

Here’s a very good article on the Supreme Court case of the D.C. Gun Ban by John and Maxim Lott.  But this case really has little to do with our gun rights.  It’s really whether we have any rights at all.  …Right here in Indiana.  Let me explain:

What we call “government,” or “politics,” comprises the sole agency of humanity’s default state of oppression, slavery, genocide and war. Individuals, no matter how wicked, are obviously unable to oppress, enslave and war without the delegated power and collective obedience we call “the state.”

Politicians and political schools of course tell you that civil society cannot exist without their organized and variously/occasionally benign prohibitions and punishments.  This isn’t true, but for now we’ll leave alone the idea that government isn’t always entirely bad.

But it usually is.  History demonstrates redundantly that if we don’t actively and continuously fight our default state of oppression and murder, we will indeed suffer as most people have suffered since shortly after Cain slew Abel. That’s just the way human societies work.

Read the Declaration of Independence and you’ll see that our nation sprang from men who really wanted only the rights due them as English subjects.  They didn’t want to create a new nation, but found it necessary to create one as their King was intractable to reason…and law. 

This is a pattern. A nation begins with at least some degree of liberty for its citizens.  The nation thrives to the degree its citizens have freedom. The rulers get greedy/corrupt. Freedoms and property are progressively stolen. The nation fails.

If you grant this take on human history and behavior, let us then consider where we are in the life cycle of a nation by considering what some noted Americans have said:

There never was a good war or a bad peace. ~Benjamin Franklin

Of all the enemies to public liberty, war is perhaps the most to be dreaded because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. ~James Madison

The means of defense against foreign danger historically have become the instruments of tyranny at home. ~James Madison

If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. ~James Madison

America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter, and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves. ~Abraham Lincoln

We Americans have no commission from God to police the world. ~Benjamin Harrison

War settles nothing.~Dwight D. Eisenhower

A state of war only serves as an excuse for domestic tyranny. ~Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

When American presidents prepare for foreign wars, they lie. ~Robert Higgs

I just want you to know that, when we talk about war, we’re really talking about peace. ~George W. Bush

Now I’ll not suggest that our troubles began with GWB.  No, we’ve had trouble since constitution’s signatures were still wet.  The price of liberty has always been eternal vigilance…against politicians.

But what I am suggesting is that Americans are threatened like never before.  We’ve been lied to for so long (via mass media, government schools, political races) that we don’t even know how this country is supposed to work.

In fact, some may wonder why, if I’m running for Governor of Indiana, I’m worried about the Supreme Court or even the Constitution for the United States of America.

Well, because it’s the Governor’s job to worry about such things, that’s why.

The Indiana Governor swears an oath to both constitutions, you know.  It’s the states who’re responsible for federalism (as opposed to the unitary government we now suffer).  Read the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, and you’ll see how our founders intended that the states push back, hard, to ensure federal government.

As the governors are the executives, the executors of both constitutions, it’s therefore the job of governors to worry about undeclared wars and stolen rights far more than it’s their job to subsidize the Colts with taxpayer money.

Bad History + Status Quo = Bad Future

 If history demonstrates anything, it’s that politics has always been our deadliest abstraction. Your neighbor by himself can, at most, steal a few things or even kill a few people before somebody with a gun stops him. But call that same person a “politician” or a “king,” and he or she can, with our collective allegiance and in the name of the greater good, take everything, kill millions, oppress, enslave and wage war. Not only do these people often get away with it, but those not caught or killed in the midst of their evil are typically called heroes.

And history shows that politicians invoke such terror by an invariably repetitious, astoundingly simple modus operandi: they break laws, both written and moral – and they do it precisely to the degree and duration that we let them get away with it.

I’ll skip citing examples since I’m sure you can think of plenty from Nero to Stalin to George W Bush. George Orwell stated the obvious when he said that political language “is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable.” What’s hard to understand is why we keep falling for it.

The question at hand, now very pressing, is what do we do with our lawbreaking politicians? The answer is, typically, that we do nothing, and reap horrific consequences.

I’m not happy with that answer, yet I’ve had little luck trying to get people motivated to even ASK politicians for Rule of Law instead of Rule of Tyrants.

Remember, words like “holocaust” do not apply to even your worst neighbors. But such catastrophes are always on the To Do list of a politician, and apparently never foreseen by citizens.

…Or is there more hope than I’d imagined?

I never expected Ron Paul would connect to so many people with his “out of touch” message of liberty. I never expected a “throwback” or “fringe” candidate could raise so much money and cause so much excitement among so many. Of course I’m maddened that he’s treated so unfairly by both the media and his own party. But I had expected his candidacy to fizzle and disappear long ago under the combination of corrupt power and citizen stupor.

Are people waking up? Is now the time to reignite the torch of liberty?

I don’t know. But I don’t want to squander the opportunity, if it exists.

It’s getting awfully late in the 2008 election cycle, but since we currently have nobody at all even running for the constitutional office of Indiana Governor, there’s nothing for me to do but run for that office myself, right? 

I’m not fooling myself or anyone else. My chances don’t depend upon me, they depend upon voters. I’ve already thrown myself against that so-far intransigent brick wall many times, yet I’ll never again stoop to “pragmatic” pandering through “mainstream” electioneering (e.g., running as a Republican). That has never worked for any good purpose, and has always been a tool of evil.

So I’ll not sacrifice my job or anyone else’s job/sanity/health. I’ll delegate an awful lot (even public appearances, speaking, etc.) to others. If we can’t find enough people to spread that load, then we’ll have no shot on Election Day anyway, right?

We’ll play no games but we’ll have fun and do good work on behalf of liberty and justice. Who, among you who have an obvious interest in governed government, will join me?

Please send me your contact info, and we’ll get started. We can’t start too soon.  

“Find out just what the people will submit to and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue until they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.” – Frederick Douglass 

“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.” -Benjamin Franklin 

“A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government.” -Edward Abbey

“Give me Liberty, or give me my Money Back!” –me

 

Leash Laws – The Only Ones That Matter

With every new anti-constitutional law, people say, “the innocent have nothing to fear.”

Given that none of us are truly innocent (I’ve seen y’all drive, and I know how y’all vote), I already see a a problem.  But given the history of human government (oppression, slavery, genocide and war), that phrase, “the innocent have nothing to fear,” is an inexcuseably stupid thing to say.  …Particularly when a power-mad nut-job decides the meaning of “innocent.”

But OK, how about we turn that saying around and see if it works?  Would an innocent government fear citizens?  Certainly not, right?  But that raises questions about our secretive, increasingly intrusive and authoritarian government.  Or at least it should raise a lot of questions.

Because, who should you fear most; some head-case hermit with a gun, or a malevolent Hitler with a Napoleon complex who has around three million troops (including the Reserves), each armed with weapons that you are forbidden to own?

The loner can kill, at most, 30 or 40 before getting nailed (probably by one of the few citizens still armed).  But when governments go sour, death tolls spike into the millions.  A thief can steal your house; but only government can steal all you own, including your house…along with any record that you ever existed.

Why mention all this depressing stuff? 

The “Continuity of Government Commission” (COGC) and rapidly increasing numbers of anti-constitutional laws seem like a responsible attempt to keep America safe and secure from the zealots who’ve attacked us with boxcutters and exploding shoes.  But there are a couple of important things to keep in mind:

1.      No such radical alteration of our governance happened during the Cold War with nuclear missiles pointed at us.   It never happened when we fought Hitler.  It certainly didn’t happen when Washington, D.C. was sacked and burned by the British.  In fact, the closer in history we were to real knowledge of oppression, the more Americans defended their liberties…not some false sense of “security.”

2.      Our government is already unlike it ever was before.  In every way but open recognition of fact, our government has become fascist (seriously; read how Mussolini – the man who coined the term himself – defined fascism).  You mean nothing.  The government means everything.  Very Un-American.

3.      You hardly need more than #2 above, but keep in mind that the history of such arrangements is 100% grim death and oppression.  There is no good history here.  Only bad.  Very bad.

4.      The laws enacting it have already been signed.  You probably never heard about it.  You can’t have read some of them…they’re kept secret.  …From you.

But hey, the innocent have nothing to fear, right?

If you’d like to do something about this, here’s what you do:

1.      Read this and this.  It won’t take long, it shouldn’t be painful, and it’s a perspective you’ve never been taught in government schools.

2.      You can almost certainly summarize better than I can.  I’m pretty wordy.  So summarize what you get out of those things and write letters to your politicians; particularly the executives.  Ask them to, in short, obey their side of the contracts.  Obey written laws as written.  Tell them to take the leash off of you, and put it on politicians, where it belongs.

3.      Stay tuned.  We must do something organized, public, and (to get the media there) a bit dramatic to insist that politicians obey their leash laws. 

Our constitutions are leash laws, y’know.  They are a leash on power; a leash on politicians; a leash on all who’d be dangerous to you in the most dangerous ways.

Our politicians are dangerous beasts indeed.  It’s time we treat them appropriately.

The Best Compromise Ever

On Thursday, December 20 at around 9:02 and 11:53 am, WFIU FM (Bloomington, Indiana) will air the following in a segment of “Speak Your Mind:”

“This is Andy Horning, and I have what I think is a reasonable request:   

I want politicians to obey written laws, as written.  No “interpretation” from the bench; no “legal precedents;” no ifs, ands or buts. 

If a law is unclear, politicians can clarify it in print.  If a law is bad, then they can change it, or delete it – in print.     

But I want no more fudging or cheating.  I want politicians to obey what’s written, as written.

In other words, I want the Rule of Law under state and federal constitutions, right here in the USA, that we say we’re fighting for in Iraq. 

That’s it.  That’s what I want.   

Yes, I know.  Constitutions are called “outdated,” as if they can’t be amended.  Constitutions are called “living documents,” as if that makes it OK to swindle them, too.    

It’s no surprise that politicians say such things.  Constitutions are a leash on politicians, after all, and you’d never expect those bad dogs to beg for the leash. 

But most of us have problems with constitutions too.     

Take the Bill of Rights.  Many of us want the 2nd Amendment, but many of us don’t.  About half of us want the 4th and 5th Amendments, but half don’t.  It seems that nobody wants the whole 1st amendment, and almost everybody completely ignores the ninth and tenth.   

We apparently can’t accept that the whole constitution is both the best compromise ever, and the law.  We’re quick to call an unconstitutional foul when it suits us, but are otherwise happy to ignore the laws that protect us from oppression, slavery, genocide and war. 

I challenge you to take just a little time and actually read the state and federal constitutions.  See for yourself if you’re willing to give your neighbor his freedom in order to secure your own.  I’m betting that you’ll conclude that the best compromise of all time is good enough. 

So let’s do this:  Let’s demand that our politicians keep their oaths of office, and obey the laws that both authorize, and limit, their powers.  Let’s accept nothing less.   

Then we will enjoy the blessings of liberty – by allowing others theirs, too. 

For Speak Your Mind, this is Andy Horning.”

 On Friday, the MP3 should be in WFIU’s Archives section.  

Utterly LOST

Just to refresh your memory, you didn’t vote for anybody in the UN.  You never will vote for a UN member because you can’t.  You have no control over those people at all.  No citizens anywhere in the world do. 

While inside the UN building they may argue that they are a democratic global government, the UN is a totally undemocratic force overwhelmingly comprised of totalitarian nations.

It’s as corrupt, destructive and foolish as you’d expect from any such body of unregulated power.

Out of the 53 nations on the Human Rights Commission, 16 are known for systematic slavery.  The UN has been worse than worthless in any major crisis in the years since its creation…years marked, by the way, by more wars, more genocides, more trouble of almost any sort, than before it was heaved into life.

Forget the silly little caprices like the Food for Oil scandal.  The UN promotes oppression and death to a degree that makes its looting and food fights in the UN building (No, really…read this) seem like wholesome, intelligent fun.

Well, what are these violent evil fools up to now?

It’s called, very appropriately and perhaps even as a sick joke, “LOST,” for Law Of the Sea Treaty.  And what it is should alarm you out of your citizen snooze and make you get all 1776.

Basically, LOST is the UN taking control of the oceans.  All ocean-touching commerce, security, communication, the works, will be under the control of third-rate Napoleons that answer to nobody and get their money from you…without asking.

Of course global socialists like Lugar and Bayh support this, so you need to vigorously express your displeasure to them.

You have two weeks.

Just two weeks.

Get on the phone.  Phone is better than email or fax.  Click on the links above to get all the contact info on each of those life-long politicians, and let them know that you’ll retire them if they don’t pull back from LOST.