Nullification – It already happens, all the time

I want two things from every level of politics:

1. A federal 10th Amendment / Indiana Article I Section 25 view of our constitutions.

2. Nullification of everything else from politics.

Our constitutions have already been effectively nullified by the endless stream of political prohibitions and mandates, subsidies and taxes, regulations and corruption.  I want our constitutions, state and federal, reinstated, by nullifying everything that violates them.

I’ll explain.

“Nullification” as a legal doctrine, is very simply, invalidating a law by ignoring it, ruling against it, or refusing to enforce or obey it.  When states nullify a federal law, it’s often called “interposition,” but that’s just fancy talk.

Among the few who understand their meaning, the words “nullification” and “interposition” have somehow acquired a simultaneously religious, conspiratorial and rebellious meaning.  That is weird, because nullification and interposition happen every day, everywhere in the USA.

If you look up the terms on a legal site or Wikipedia, you will likely read that the practice has never been upheld in court. But that’s bunk-in-action.

Practically all legislation, Executive Orders, bureaucratic rules; practically every high court case and government action at every level nullifies some part of our constitutions, our laws and culture.  Courts nullify legislation all the time…it actually is part of their job.

Sometimes the nullification is subtle and by parts; such as laws restricting the right to weapons, or nationalizing our state militias, which increasingly nullify the Second Amendment and our whole constitutional and social design for peace, sane foreign policy, and self-defense.

Sometimes it’s overt; such as when President Obama and the DOJ nullified the Defense Of Marriage Act in 2011; or when Obama essentially nullified the 2006 Secure Fence Act (I’m not saying it was wrong to do so in either case).  Or when the FCC started regulating the internet in violation of a federal court order (that was wrong). …Or when Kim Davis attempted to nullify both a Judge’s and Governor’s nullification of an Amendent of the Kentucky Constitution which nullified the federal constitution (that was a lot of nullification, and I am saying that Davis was wrong to do it).

Sometimes the nullification is from ignorance.  Who’s read the state constitution, for instance…so how would anybody know when politicians violate it?

Sometimes it is by brute force when a cop nullifies rights literally to death.

Rarely, some smart-Alec citizen invokes a jury’s right to nullify bad laws or bad application of law.  (Juries have tremendous power; though judges never tell jurors that anymore).

However you look at it, and from every level of government, from the citizen on up, nullification happens every single day.

Every Single Day.BWLadyLib

Let that sink in a minute.

 

Every day.

It happens.

All the time.

Everywhere.

Up to now, there’s been a direction to that nullification.

To make governments, bureaucracies, corporations and programs bigger, costlier, more heavily armed and aggressive, more intrusive, more secretive and even more corrupt (though that last part is getting very hard to do), constitutions at both state and federal levels, had to be nullified.

Not all nullification has been bad.  Courts have nullified what used to be the “settled law” of past generations in some good ways.  Slavery exists now mostly in other countries, and the Jim Crow laws are gone, thank God.  But the power the federal government gobbled up in the meantime has been used to heap entirely different evils upon us, such that now, our trans-generational debt/theft machines and their incessant wars are about to cause us horrible grief.

My vote is mine.  I won’t waste it anymore on the status quo mess.  I mean to use my power of peaceful revolution as intended.

So here’s all that I will vote for:

1. A federal 10th Amendment / Indiana Article I Section 25 view of our constitutions.

2. Nullification of everything else from politics!

In other words, I want government to do exactly and only what it’s supposed to do, and otherwise leave us and everybody else alone.  I want politicians out of our lives and wallets and rights as much as humanly possible.  I want a lot LESS from politicians, in summary.

And I won’t vote for any less than that.

 

*Well…OK, the candidate can’t be a Democrat/Republican, but that’s a different story...

 

Technology versus Politics

Technology is marvelous. It tends to make things better, cheaper, more available. It tends to make people happy.

Politics, on the contrary, is the opposite of all the above.  The most exciting, promising technology turns divisive, corrupt, costly and deadly once politicians get their mitts on it.

We should never have let them monkey with our healthcare.  I’ve said so many times in the past (see links below), and I’ll keep saying so until we snap out of our stupor …or it comes crashing down around us (at which point I will say I Told You So).

So, let me offer just one, seemingly minor, even merely clerical reason, why your healthcare sucks.

It’s called ICD-10.

First of all, in my business of healthcare information/image technology, compliance with ICD-10 has been an enormous (i.e. expen$ive) undertaking. There are seven squillion, nine hundred and ninety three fillion codes (give or take) to correlate to software hooks and data. It has made the inherently complex business of making products for patient care even more complex.

The mass of codes and interrelations is certainly a hassle for the engineers making stuff to sell to doctors – presumably to make healthcare providers’ jobs easier (at increa$ed co$t, of cour$e).

But what does ICD-10 mean to doctors, patients and the tangle of insurance companies and taxpayers who ultimately pay for all this complexity?

Well, as of October 1, the wrong code can lead to not only a denied claim and/or months/years of costly hassle, but perhaps significant punishment (on basis of “Medicare Fraud” among other things too legally frightening to mention) for the doctor/institution as well.

Good, you say?

You want fewer mistakes in medicine.

Yes of course.  We all do.

Doctors must do better, certainly.  Prescription drugs, correctly taken, kill more people by far than do “illegal” drugs.  And hospital stays in general (with iatrogenic infections, drugs, mistakes, etc.) kill more Americans than everything but cancer and heart disease.

But what does “do better” mean?  And how do we help make that happen?

And how much arm-twisting, lawsuit-hurling, defrocking, fining and imprisoning force does it take to be helpful??

Let’s see how ICD-10 “helps.”

Let’s say a Farmer Andy comes to the Family Practice clinic with an infected wound that he’s not so sure he can explain. Stuff happens to farmers all the time, and he just can’t remember what this wound was from, initially. He’s always getting bangs and scrapes and cuts, after all.

(And let us be truthful. Andy is a terrible farmer. He’s mostly into quixotic politics)

So, what was the injury initiating this visit?

It’s legally critical we get this right!

Was it ICD-10 code W55.21, “Bitten by a cow,” or W61.33, “Pecked by a chicken?”

Was it when he became a V00.01 “Pedestrian on foot injured in a collision with roller skater?”
Come to think of it, he had been visiting his nephew in prison when that happened, which could add a Y92.147,“Courtyard of prison as the place of occurrence of the external cause.”

Does that qualify as a Z63.1, “Problems in relationship with in-laws?”

Anyway, the doctor knows it wasn’t Y92.253, “Hurt at the Opera,” since Farmer Andy hasn’t gone there since the last episode…(we mustn’t discuss it here.  That would be a violation of HIPAA rules which could lead to a revoked license and even prison).

Farmer Andy did mention (under his breath, seemingly ashamed) that it could have been an “Accident while knitting or crocheting,” which would be a Y93.D1.

The doctor hated to ask, but since he knew Andy and his family had been to Sea World, could Andy have been “Struck by Orca, initial encounter,” which would be a W56.22?

No, said Andy.  It certainly wouldn’t have been a Killer Whale, nor was it a strike.

There was perhaps that bite from a Sea Lion, Andy recalled.  Though it wasn’t the first time, or even the second time that had happened.

So that would be a W56.11XS “Sequela…Bitten by Sea Lion.”

Hmmm, the doctor thought. That would have a very specific look to it.  No; it must be something else.

The wound wouldn’t look like this if it were a V91.07 “Burn due to water-skis on fire,” certainly.  He’d seen plenty of those before.

And the doctor could tell just by looking at him that Farmer Andy hadn’t been “Sucked into jet engine,” or X52.

Or was he getting the codes wrong?

Damn!

Wait…X52 is actually “Prolonged stay in weightless environment.”

Was it V95.40? No…that one is the rather vague, “Unspecified spacecraft accident injuring occupant.”

How about Y37.54?  (Doctor types in code and waits…it’s a big database)

When the doctor worked in the hospital, there was an entire department of people whose only job is to “do coding.”  Here in the clinic, they’ve got a part-time/outside IT department, and sometimes their network bogs down, and…
Oh, here it comes…

Oh heck no!  Y37.54 is “Military operation involving nuclear radiation effects of nuclear weapon.”  SMH, he thought.  He should’ve remembered this one from last week’s incident.

Ah, there it is…V97.33 is the sucked-into-jet-engine code.

Dang it, he has to remember that.  The CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) “ICD-10 Ombudsman” was fairly lenient last time.

He can’t afford to make that mistake again!

OK, I have a question for you.  Does the preceding strike you as the best way to improve healthcare delivery?

No?

Now, codifying data is a great idea.  In the right hands and in the right way, when we’re ready (this is a key part), then having convenient, appropriate labels for all our data makes it easier to store, find, and use in a meaningful way.  And I’m even all in favor of people using ICD-10 exactly as it is…if they choose to.

Let me restate that.

If people trained in the care of patients, in their situation (hospital, clinic, private practice) find that using ICD-10 codes helps them treat patients, then great.  Excellent, even!

But that’s not how our $y$tem work$, is it?  It’s not up to the healthcare professional how things are billed and paid anymore.  It hasn’t been for many years now.  In the most practical $en$e, politicians are more involved in healthcare decisions than doctors are.  Doctors can bill for only what they can get paid for by people other than patients; and that is determined by politicians.  In this case, technology becomes more of a parasite than an aid.

As a true-free-market technology guy, that breaks my heart.

Just imagine you’re trying to sell something; a product you make, your old car, cookies at a bake sale…but bickering politicians, lawyers and lobbyists determined what you could charge for it.  Imagine they demand you buy some things, and don’t let you buy others…and that every political intervention not only directly affects your job…it substantially changes your job.

How would that work out in the real world?

And the way “meaningful use” and other “federal” requirements are being FORCED on healthcare providers is, at this state in our knowledge and technology, madness on top of even more madness (do I even need to mention Obamacare?).

To make matters worse, healthcare has been a union shop/monopoly for over a hundred years.  There can be no serious competition with what politicians and lobbyists call healthcare.

If the rest of our technology worked like this, we’d all be clacking away on Windows 3.1, at best.

There were smart people involved in the development of ICD codes.  Lots of them.  But their seemingly dedicated work was performed in disconnection from monetary, human and practical technology concerns.  It’s another good example, in fact, of such obsessive bureaucratic “paperwork” (albeit mostly without paper), that the recording and processing of all this data can and often does compromise patient care in ways analogous to the Observer Effect.

OK, so I have another question for you.

Should we let doctors, who go to school for many years and spend a lot of time in residency and continuous training, actually do the jobs they were trained to do, or should we continue to vote for ever-more intrusion into that profession by politicians, who don’t need any education or even interest in healthcare at all?

Well, please think on it.

It’s your money, your rights, your life and health at stake here, you know.

https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2013/10/15/can-politicians-even-define-health-care/

https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2009/07/28/health-insurance…or-healthcare…choose-one/

https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2009/09/23/a-short-history-of-health-care-let-doctors-be-doctors/

SHOULD we fight? For what? Are we ready?

There’s a lot of chest-beating, sturm und drang over the recent events in Nevada.  Some people think this should be our Battle of Lexington.
Americans should’ve been up in arms a hundred years ago, when a relative handful of moneychanger cronies took over the country.  That would’ve been morally and constitutionally warranted.  So I suppose every minute since then could serve as good as another to set things right in this nation.

But…why this?
And how did we get here?

Isn’t the corruption of our republic exactly and only what We The People have freely and repetitiously chosen every Tax Day, every Election Day for the past one hundred years?
We are here because it’s where we chose to go.  What’s different now?  What’s in Nevada that should make us fight?

The Nevada Constitution (1864) is dreadful.
First, under the ordinance empowering the state’s constitutional convention was this:
“Third. That the people inhabiting said territory do agree and declare, that they forever disclaim all right and title to the unappropriated public lands lying within said territory, and that the same shall be and remain at the sole and entire disposition of the United States.”

And that led to some of the most horrible words humans ever wrote into law in their Article I, Section 2:

“But the Paramount Allegiance of every citizen is due to the Federal Government in the exercise of all its Constitutional powers as the same have been or may be defined by the Supreme Court of the United States; and no power exists in the people of this or any other State of the Federal Union to dissolve their connection therewith or perform any act tending to impair[,] subvert, or resist the Supreme Authority of the government of the United States. The Constitution of the United States confers full power on the Federal Government to maintain and Perpetuate its existance [existence], and whensoever any portion of the States, or people thereof attempt to secede from the Federal Union, or forcibly resist the Execution of its laws, the Federal Government may, by warrant of the Constitution, employ armed force in compelling obedience to its Authority.”

There’s a lot of anticonstitutional, antilibertarian madness in that; perhaps the worst being that it essentially places the Supreme Court above both the states, and the federal constitution itself.  That’s entirely opposed to the founders’ original intent and plain words.

That phrase, “…as the same have been or may be defined by the Supreme Court of the United States” replaces the written US constitution with SCOTUS whimsy.  And that phrase makes the constitution of Nevada irrelevant in any way other than as a declaration of complete obeisance to our global ruling class.

I’ve already said I understand the role of physical resistance and even violence in the way that MLK Jr’s efforts were almost certainly made more effective by the “bad cop” role of people like Robert F. Willams (president of the Monroe, North Carolina chapter of the NAACP – you should look up his story – very relevant to 2nd Amendment discussions) the Black Power movement, Black Panthers, etc.

But man o man I wish the armed and angry folks would find a better cause to fight over than what’s happening with the ever-vague land use rights in the west…particularly in Nevada.

I’ve got a list of things that should make you tornado rocket nuclear lightning mad, if you’re interested.  (like, you and your loved ones are being robbed and deceived right now…as I write this)

But let’s agree to how we’re to live instead before we try to overthrow anything or anybody.  Because what we’ve got is what we have been choosing for a hundred years every Election Day.

There are hard ways and easy ways to change things.  But before you go and change things again (remember, what we have really is change – change is constant), you’d better finally get into your head exactly what it is that you want instead.

Two puppets, and a baaad puppeteer

We have been told that we operate under a “two party system” that, in fact, never existed in law or practice.

What does exist, is a globe-spanning criminal crony network that has hoodwinked and robbed us for generations.

Given the incessant, ongoing revelations of scandal and corruption in our government, as well as the common observation that things have gone terribly wrong, my hope is that more of us awaken to this fact, and vote accordingly.

That awakening is a long time coming.  The worst of the crime ring’s basic infrastructure started just over a hundred years ago with a network of private bankers given monopoly power over our currency.  With their debt/inflation-based fiat currency comes an ancient pattern of failure that consumed most of the greatest civilizations in history.  And this time, it is truly a global colossus that is about to collapse in what would be the worst, most violent and impoverishing conflagration ever.

This is a lot of “conspiracy theory” to absorb, let alone believe, so for now I’ll ignore the global monetary, espionage and military systems, and start with what you can see every day here in Indiana.

The Indiana Constitution’s Article I, Section 23 is strong and specific in prohibiting special individual or class rights: “The General Assembly shall not grant to any citizen, or class of citizens, privileges or immunities, which, upon the same terms, shall not equally belong to all citizens.”

In direct violation of this clear prohibition, members of the private clubs called the Democratic and Republican parties have incrementally and over the past century created and protected special powers as “major” parties under Indiana Code.

It’s surprising how many people don’t know that only the Ds and Rs get taxpayer-funded primary elections that serve as vehicles for free media promotion, more donations, and direct public involvement with the internal affairs of their parties.  Only they can have Precinct Committeemen with special political rights and powers, yet without the constitutional and antitrust restrictions on other political officeholders.  Only “the major political parties” are entitled to serve on the Indiana Election Commission and Recount Commission, among other things.

Worse still is that the Democratic and Republican parties have illegally placed arbitrary barriers and special requirements on all alternative candidates that make it vastly more difficult for them to get on ballots, be seen on ballots, or even come close to the level of taxpayer-supported organization voters assume are shared by all political parties.

In case you think that new law trumps old law; that’s not how constitutions work at all.  Both Indiana’s Article I, Section 25, and the federal constitution’s 10th amendment make it plain that violations of the constitutions are null and void; they’re no more “law” than if a cat coughed them up.

The good news is that all governments are by consent of the governed.  Even the most oppressive regimes are overthrown when the people have had enough.  And we have elections so that our revolutions can be peaceful.

So, look around the various structural and media roadblocks to research the truth on your own.

I’m hoping you’ll realize that even participating in their primary elections gives too much help to corrupt parties that don’t need our help.  I hope you’ll see that it’s not alternative candidates who need to explain what they’re doing on the ballot.  I really hope you’ll look at what our nation has become, look at the agents of that monstrosity, and ask, “How dare you show yourself on our ballots again?

HorningCongress640

Can politicians even define “health care?”

I’ve worked in healthcare since 1978 in public health, research, clinical, education and industry roles.  And I can’t tell you what healthcare is.

Ascelpius-V-PoliticsTo my wife, it’s massage and things that smell nice.  To others, it’s Reiki, or heterodox nutrition.  Some debate that vaccines are bad medicine, but marijuana is great healthcare.  And they have convincing arguments.

Is gender-reassignment, or voodoo healthcare too?  I don’t know.

I think cardiovascular science and technology is really cool stuff, it’s my specialty, and I think it should qualify as healthcare.  But as for everything else?  I can’t even give you a clean definition of “health.”  And I’ve been in the business my whole life.

Politicians sure think they know all about it.  And by the Election Day polling numbers, well-over 90% of us believe and trust that politicians should control …everything.

But after the more than 100 years the unionized AMA has wielded political monopoly power, the 80 years of taxpayer subsidized health insurance, 60 years of socialized health, education and welfare, and the almost 50 years of even more directly socialized healthcare in the form of our rapidly swelling Medicare system, I’m appalled that we think we want more politics in healthcare.  I’m disgusted that we’ve been lead to believe that health insurance is what we want when that is often antithetical to healthcare.  And I’m embarrassed that We The People haven’t seen a better way to live that’s always been right before us.

In every field of science, technology and plain old merchandise that isn’t so political, costs decrease while quality, efficacy and availability increases with every new advance.  Luxuries of yesterday like cellphones and personal computers are now ubiquitous and powerful necessities.

The in-your-face availability and range of price/quality in shoes, coffee, kitchen gadgets and even things like used magazines and historical wristwatch reproductions has become amazing in a relative freedom from political control.

There’ve been innumerable healthcare advances in the last century that would’ve made healthcare cheap, effective, and easily available to all…if not for all the politics that’s been creeping in since Teddy Roosevelt’s time.
Politicians have already made everything related to medicine unfair, complicated, ever-changing, severely limited, and ghastly expensive.

And they’re not done yet.

However, none of the preceding is any part of my main objection to more politics in healthcare.
I’ll let others quibble over whether politicians will finally be able to keep a promise, or make something work at all as advertised.

The real problem, whenever we rub that genie’s lamp of politics, is corruption, and calamity.

Everything government does, it does by force.  Politics can’t do anything without at least the threat of fines, taxes, courts, guns and prisons.

It’s easy to dream that this kind of force can be used for good.  But the usual reality, as evidenced by all of human history, is a scale and degree of injustice and death that only politics can achieve.
Power is of course a seduction for those who’d wield it.  But it’s just as attractive to those who can simply buy the portion of such power as suits their purposes.

And make no mistake.  All power is for sale.

Whenever politicians are allowed to steal a new power, there’s a new industry in lobbying for the use of that power.  We can see how that lobby has worked for the military industrialists and bankers, and we should see what it has done to our health, education and welfare as well.

Adding more power to government, with more snooping into things that are more personal than ever before possible, only makes the resulting corruption more dangerous.

Hitler’s infamous “T4” eugenics/euthanasia program under Germany’s socialized healthcare system certainly demonstrated one hazard in giving politicians so much power over life.  But think about what we already know of our own government; what they’ve admitted to from the past (testing plutonium on school kids, syphilis experiments on black men, experiments on soldiers), and what they’ve been forced to admit recently about their spying, militarization and deceit.   Think hard about how much more secretive, powerful and deceitful we know our government to be now than ever before; and just what such a government is capable of doing with the actual coding in our cells.

And changing the role of healthcare workers from healers to government agents who’ll give to politicians everything from your DNA to your intimate personal and family details, will, over time, change the sort of people who’d seek out such a career.
You really shouldn’t want that to happen.

We The People have exactly and only what we have freely and repetitiously chosen not just every every day we sigh, and yield to what we know is wrong and isn’t working; but also every Election Day.

Elections were meant to be a means of peaceful revolution.  We’d better finally use them for that purpose, because the power over our bodies we’re granting to politicians now will have no good end, unless that end is determined by our change of heart and mind.

RELATED POSTS:
https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2009/09/23/a-short-history-of-health-care-let-doctors-be-doctors/
https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2009/07/28/health-insurance%E2%80%A6or-healthcare%E2%80%A6choose-one/

Updated Annotations to the US Constitution

Sorry it’s been so long since I’ve edited this…

https://wedeclare.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/the-united-states-constitution.pdf

Are our political abstractions killing us?

idolatry

Over the years I’ve increasingly thought it interesting that the first two of the Ten Commandments, in essence, warn against …idolatry.

Sure, murder is bad; but that’s way down at number six; before adultery, stealing, lying and coveting.

From a context of politics, anyway, the first two commandments, something like “In God We Trust,” warn against making abstractions (OK, other than God, if you’re an atheist) real.

I’ve come to think of this as brilliant.

Yes, the way the commandments are ordered, from first establishing proper relationships, to concomitant proper behavior, is eminently logical, proper and wise.

But I’m not writing this about wisdom, logic, morality or even sanity; I’m writing about politics. That damnable abstraction, is, as you should know by now, the opposite of all that is good and wholesome. It is delegated force reflecting and amplifying all our fears, jealousy, selfishness, violence…it’s our sins, heavily armed.  We’d have none of it if we could behave.  But the people in politics tend to behave even worse than the general population.

So, the secular corollary of In God We Trust is, after all, In Politics We Do Not.

So let’s get something straight – there are no such “things” as politics, political parties, nations, “Us” or “Them.” You can’t punch a corporation or tickle a union. You can’t feed an economy to starve a recession because they are abstractions. They exist, really, only in our collective, inherently tribal…and idolatrous, minds.

In real life, human society consists of individual humans and our individual actions.

We may try to delegate away our own part in decisions and actions by claiming some office or duty to a corporation, a government, a racial/societal class, or an army.  But in ultimately accountable fact, we, as individuals, choose and act as individuals.

This is the basis of “Austrian School” praxeology, or action axiom, besides being an important message of the Ten Commandments.

Properly understood, this concept of individual choice and rejection of idolatry (assigning judgment and action to abstractions, and/or pledging obedience to abstractions) fully dismisses as absurd such following rationalizations:

  1. We all must sacrifice some of our own comforts to save the economy.
  2. It’d be better if our President was (gay, Hispanic, atheist, a woman or whatever)
  3. Corporations are bad while unions are good; or visa versa.
  4. It took us a long time to screw up this bad; it’ll take us a long time to do better.
  5. It’s a cruel, complicated world; we need cruel and complicated laws.
  6. Those other guys are scary and violent; we need more missiles and soldiers and wars.

Sadly, most of us surrender to abstraction. We solemnly pledge to obey a flag, while complaining that the politics we’ve voted for over and over again, sucks. We know our chosen political tribe is messed up, but insist it’d be madness to vote for any alternative. We suspect our “nation” abstraction won’t be around much longer; but curiously, can’t even describe what that nation really is or how it works (Social Security? Cops in riot gear? Multi-class basketball?). Some of us even advocate a “revolution” to overthrow a government that, doggone it, we freely chose ourselves.

Even ideology can be an idol.  One of the oddest things, to me as a candidate (another abstraction, BTW), is how voters will ask me how my ideology differs from the other candidates when we should know by now that ideology has nothing to do with our current form of cronyism.  Lobbyists, powerbrokers and bankster/moneychangers rule; ideology has nothing to do with it.  That’s what we’ve chosen.

Our abstractions are so deeply ingrained and heartfelt that it’s in fact difficult to communicate without invoking these abstractions…especially in politics…whatever that is.

We could always choose better. But we very, very rarely do.

So, through all recorded history, humanity’s default state has been oppression, slavery, genocide and war.  It’s only very rarely that humans choose to live in peace, prosperity and that most rare and precious abstraction of all, freedom.

Yes, incremental decay seems historically inevitable. Rapid collapse happens very frequently. But real improvement in societal terms, when it happens at all (can count on the fingers of one hand) much more frequently happens fast; by radical epiphany and action. A single generation, a single war, a single election, can change everything politically important.

All I can do as a candidate is offer a choice that’s different, and I think better, than what we’ve chosen so far.  I’m offering fewer abstractions; a real and dramatic reduction in our reliance on collective abstracted actions that, it so happens, rely on violating much of the other Ten Commandments.  Because without abstractions, you know, taxation is theft and war is murder.  And those are not good things at all.

Gay…Marriage? Is THAT what we think this is about?

PRESS RELEASE: Gay…Marriage? Is THAT what we think this is about?

Andrew Horning, Candidate for Indiana US Senate

May 15, 2012

Freedom, IN: Like all things political, the “gay marriage” issue has become far more battle cry and “litmus test” than sane discussion.

What we call gay marriage is not (I repeat, NOT) about a church recognized covenant between a man, a woman, and God.  No, the church gave that unto Caesar a long time ago.  That’s why the minister says, “…by the power vested in me by the State of…”

And it is most definitely not about love and relationships.

Marriage, my fellow Americans, is politics.

Now, marriage is about Social Security, bereavement pay, visitation rights, property rights, work rules, tax rules, and more rules, rules rules from the Great Caesar’s Golden Calf.  Marriage is legal, contractual, corporate, political privilege, rights, guardianship and healthcare.

So, those who now want to claim the moral high ground on traditional marriage have wallowed into the preposterous role of promoting disparity in matters of simple justice.

I propose we get politics entirely out of marriage.  From the Christian perspective, we should take from Caesar what is God’s. From the secular perspective, we should make policy and law that does not involve sorting, allocating and denying rights based upon abstract and arbitrary political categories.

Not only is this the moral thing to do, it is also the Law of the Land.  Our constitutions were written in large part to prevent politicians from granting “to any citizen, or class of citizens, privileges or immunities, which, upon the same terms, shall not equally belong to all citizens.” (Indiana Constitution Article I Section 23)

That is what I’m putting on the ballot – rules that are few enough to know, simple enough to understand, and important enough that they’re to apply equally…to all.

This is all written down in the annotated Indiana and US Constitutions at http://horningforsenate.com.  These precious, workable laws will be on the US Senate ballot exclusively under the name, Andrew Horning (L).

 

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Watching the eyes go cold…

I had to kill a rooster about an hour ago.   He’d been attacking people, including me.  We all agreed that, while he was a prize-winning-beautiful bird, we had too many roosters and this taloned terrorist had to go.  So I finished my workday, and put on some gloves and safety glasses.  My youngest son Hark locked the dogs inside to avoid undue excitement (you don’t want your dogs to develop a taste for your chickens), and he also put on gloves and safety glasses.

Yeah, the rooster was mean and could jump high.  His spurs are sharp and his beak drew blood too.  A few weeks ago, Hark accidentally blinded the rooster’s right eye while fighting him off, but that only made the rooster even more fearful and aggressive.

I think he knew what was coming, as Hark and I started across the field toward the free-ranging flock. Maybe the saddest part for me was when he ran behind his favorite hen; the one whose back he’d plucked completely bare.  The cocky bully turned chicken in his final moments, and my heart sank.  I almost called the whole thing off.  Maybe I should have.

I don’t know.

Anyway, while my son and I both chased him down, I got the short straw as the one able to grab the rooster first.   I scooped up the squawking chainsaw of beak, feathers and two-inch spurs, and swiftly broke his neck.

I suppose it was as quick a death as possible, but man, I hated doing that.   I took a life that was fighting for life.   He wanted to live, and I killed him.

Damn.

Since moving to the farm, I’ve had to kill many animals, for many perfectly understandable reasons, but I’ve never gotten used to it.  My hands shake and my spirit is heavy for a long time after shooting or twisting the life out of even the most vicious creature.  If anything, it’s getting harder every time.

Do not take me for a saint.  When I was very young, I had little trouble extinguishing the life of bugs, frogs, squirrels, or whatever else was on the wrong end of my shoe, slingshot, bow or gun.

But a more mature perspective has revealed to me the preciousness of life, and the horror of stealing life.  I don’t kill from childish fear or flippancy.  While I don’t at all begrudge hunters their sport, killing is never a sport to me.  It’s just something that sometimes has to be done in the real world.

Yes, this is about politics.   Damn it all, this is most definitely about politics.

What is politics, after all, but the delegation of reality to somebody else?   Politics is about taking somebody else’s money for our convenience and comforts.   It’s about risking somebody else’s life for our sense of security.   It’s about blaming somebody else for our choices and making somebody else pay for our mistakes.  Mostly, it seems these days, it’s about getting other people to do your violence for you.

Right?

Why else would we put up with it?

Anyway, the original societal design written into our state and federal constitutions is quite different from what we delude ourselves with today.

We citizens are supposed to take account for our own violence/killing…personally.  We are still (the laws of the land haven’t been altered) to be citizen soldiers, trained in the use and accountability of deadly force.  We are to consider what it means to look into another person’s eyes before snuffing out all his or her memories, relationships, hopes and opportunities.  We are to think long and hard before entering another person’s nation to serve some political whimsy.

We are to be responsible adults who treat others as we’d like to be treated.

Of course, how could the cronies who own and operate our politicians arrange their profitable wars if our 40 to 50-year-old adults had to leave their homes and careers to kill strangers on their own soil?  Would the wise and arthritic vote for entanglements by which they, personally, would have to risk their lives?

It’s by no accident that we’ve laid most of the personal risks of war upon our young and ill-informed.  We know the human brain’s ability to assess risk and benefit is undeveloped and fragile in today’s soldiering age-range of teens to thirty.  It’s too easy to whip up  the young into a Hatfield v McCoy, or Colts versus Bears tribalism.  They are too brave, too fearless, too free of adult restraint, too malleable, to be the anti-violent force that freedom requires.

And as for our “adults…”  Shame, shame, shame on us all for being so racked with fear of ever-present and ever-changing hobgoblins that we’re willing to send our own children away to die to assuage our trembling nerves.

It’s too easy for the fearful, selfish, greedy and foolish among us to direct these young bucks to do our evil for us in the name of patriotic duty, and that embarrassing rationalization of Fear Aggression Syndrome – “security.”  We’re no better than the ancient savages, sacrificing children to the gods.  Worse, perhaps, in that this is a global game of Whack-a-Mole by remote control.  We kill from our easy chairs and call it a “necessary evil.”

Maybe this is a long way to come to my core point, but I didn’t want to just come out and directly state that I abhor that “…thank a soldier” mentality.

I have great respect for soldiers.  I’ve seen the service do great things for people who serve.  I’ve met few rotten soldiers and plenty whom I admire.  Pretty much everybody in my family forever has been in the military at some point; at least a few earned military career retirement.  My dad was a decorated war pilot, POW and earned a Purple Heart.

But exactly who is it that ever takes away liberty?   Who is able to oppress, enslave and steal on a large scale?   Was it Stalin or Mao themselves who killed so many millions of their own citizens?

…Or did they have professional help?

Isn’t it obvious from even the most brief examination of humanity’s historical record that the permanent, professional standing armies that our founders warned us against are still our greatest threat?  Isn’t it only government…your own government…that actually threatens your liberty?

Yes, it’s a bloody horrible thing to take a life with your own hands.  We should hate it.  We should avoid it as though it’s a stain upon our soul.   It is a taste of hell.

But it is a far worse, insane and wicked thing to delegate our killing to others and act as though it is some hallmark of civility.

Horrible, evil things happen.  Horrible, evil things must be opposed; sometimes by force.  Deadly force is very rarely necessary, but it does happen that it is necessary to kill.

But shouldn’t we bring that force into the light and make it both accountable, and personal?

Yes, taking life is ugly.   It is hellish horrid.   We really should own up to that.   We should personally weigh that evil against the comforts we claim from it.

It is a shame that’d make our founders shudder that we have turned this abhorrent thing into a career for so many, for so long.

Published in: on April 2, 2012 at 8:30 pm  Comments (3)  

Looking for a few good voters

I plan to place a series of large-format ads in the Indianapolis Star and a few other key newspapers around the state (donations made out to Horning For Senate, if you’re so inclined).  It will be a simple ad, with a simple logo, maybe a picture of me, some contact information, and something like this:

Looking for a few good voters

If you think this nation can keep going the same direction we’re going, then, please, read no further and have a nice day.

If, however, you’re concerned about our future, then please, read on.  We may need you.

OK, the bad news is that we have nobody but ourselves to blame for the cronyism, the violence, the injustice and self-destruction of our culture.  We The People have exactly and only what We The People have chosen with our wallets, our actions, our voices (and/or silence) and our votes.  We certainly cannot blame the politicians and political abstractions we’ve chosen over and over again.  They’re just doing what comes natural, what they can get away with, and what we ask them to do.

The good news, however, is that We The People can have exactly and only what We The People choose.  We don’t have to turn to anybody else to fix our problems.  It is not too late to clean up our messes and choose the life we want to live.  It’s never too late; and there is currently no need for a “revolution” anywhere but in our own minds and voting arms.

Of course, the bad news with that is that we don’t get what we want, we get only what we choose…and we’ve felt as though there are no choices but that two-headed crony network we call the “two party system.”  We have been betrayed and deceived.  It’s understandable that your trust in any politician, even ones you’ve never given a chance, is very low.

Then again, the good news with that is that there never really has been a “two party system;” that’s just an abstraction of some pretty bad choices on our part. We can fix that with just a little information.

Alright, so the bad news is that most people can’t even imagine how this country could work better. Trained in government schools and suckled on government handouts, surrounded by government actions and always aware of our wars, nobody alive remembers how life worked before we had all the “programs,” taxation, regulation and litigation that are now sucking us dry. Nobody alive remembers how “national security” worked before we began endless games of international “whack a mole” with our children’s lives.  Nobody alive can remember how we could have schools, roads, jobs or healthcare without giving everything unto our new Caesars.  We are all caught in the monkey traps of Social Security, Medicare, “national security,” “education” and “welfare.”

Ahh, but there is more good news.  The good news that outweighs all the bad is that it’d take only a little more than a third of Hoosier voters to set this nation to a better direction, a proven direction.  It’d take only slightly more than a third to crack the cronies’ pedestals and govern our government by rules that are few enough that everyone can know them; simple enough that everyone can understand them; and important enough that every single one of them is to be obeyed by everyone (even the rich and mighty) equally, without exception, all the time.

And my fellow Hoosiers, those rules exist; they are proven to work better than anything else humans have ever tried; and they are already the Law of The Land. They can be ours again as soon as we choose them.

This is not fantasy.  The fantasy, though a very bad one, is what we’ve been doing.  The dreamers are those who think we even can preserve the authoritarian, lawless status quo.  The fools are those who keep voting for it.

We all make decisions every day that impact our families, our careers, our children’s future.  I’m asking only that you give more thought to your vote than you have ever dedicated to it before.  I’m asking that you read your state and federal constitutions to see what you have been missing, how you have been misled, and how you can fix it all on Election Day.

We can fix this country.  We can live in peace, prosperity, security and freedom if only we choose to. That choice will be at least in part represented as Andrew Horning (L) for US Senate.  But the choice is yours.