Health Insurance…or Healthcare…Choose One

At least as far back as the funeral societies of ancient Greece, humans have formed co-ops or investment groups to manage the kind of losses that happen to people rarely, without warning, or as in the case of a funeral, only once.  Early insurance organizations, like modern ones, averaged and distributed the losses to make them less painful.

These were not comprehensive relief plans.  Maybe a best friend would compensate you for the loss of a favorite hat, but the early societies and later insurance policies were intended to minimize only the loss of a ship, a precious heirloom, or a loved one.  Such insurance was rarely compulsory because the benefits were clear, and forced participation would change the mathematics of sustainable cost versus periodic benefit.

Imagine what would happen, for example, if lawmakers decided that legal minimum auto insurance wasn’t enough.  What if they decreed that insurance companies must pay every driver for regular auto maintenance, new shocks, batteries, and even the cost of gas?  Imagine tax money and tax benefits stirred into the mix.  The mathematics would go so out of whack that it would no longer be anything like insurance.  We’d have only a usuriously inefficient pre-payment scheme for everyday occurrences.  The rare collisions and breakdowns for which you’d really want insurance would become insignificant to the total costs involved.

So to stay in business in such a regulatory/fiscal swamp, auto insurance companies would start jacking up premiums and denying claims.  Outraged by rising costs and worsening service, drivers would beg lawmakers to enact cost caps and more regulations against the now-vilified mechanics and insurance companies.  But the pricing rules, bizarre service regulations, and now-necessary political lobbying would drive some mechanics and insurance companies out of business, while others would learn the game and rake in the dough.  On the other hand, even the cleverest shops would have to hire legions of front-office staff to handle the increasingly tricky paperwork and guidelines.  Grumbling about long waits, co-payments, changing service providers, and extra charges for high octane fuel, motorists would forgo routine oil changes or new tires, and cross their fingers against the catastrophic breakdown.  Some motorists would seek “alternative” car care services from chanting transmission savants who’d burn incense to heal a dying clutch.

Ultimately, the bloated world of automobile services would collapse, leaving only a niche market catering to the elite.

So far, this is only a dream scenario for public transportation advocates.

Now here’s the real question:

Which would you rather have -universal health insurance, or health care?   You can’t have both.   The numbers don’t work, and we’re already witnessing the result.

In a free market, prices drop and availability improves with every technological advance.  That’s not what’s happening in healthcare, is it?   Increased demand should lead to increased supply unless somebody uses force to change the rules.

That force has been building against healthcare since the late 1800’s, when Germany’s Chancellor Bismarck made socialized health insurance the latest thing from Europe.  Wage and price controls during WWII, along with a tax exemption for employer-provided health insurance sealed a devil’s bargain at a time when technology was revolutionizing healthcare.  Costs should have come down, but they were climbing, just as house calls and bartered care were getting pushed away.

And healthcare became tied to employment, because healthcare became one and the same as health insurance.   Health insurance was a perk of work with the real costs tax-subsidized into invisibility.  This caused a moral hazard, by which people began to use healthcare services differently than if they knew the actual costs.  This started the upward climb in real costs.   So without a job to hide those costs, healthcare spiraled out of reach.

Then President Johnson signed Medicare into law in 1965.  The doctors, businessmen and insurance companies who’d previously opposed socialized medicine hardly dared to speak against this keystone in the arch of the “Great Society.”  Almost at once, market logic was replaced by all that’s worst about politics.

Not so long ago, congress started using Medicare money to pay politically savvy teaching hospitals to reduce the number of doctors they trained.  As with paying farmers to ignore farming, our congress decided that healthcare needed price supports.  Yet Medicare payments for real services have been cut again and again across the board, with the most dramatic cuts yet just ahead.

As you should expect with politics, however, these cuts don’t lower costs…just the opposite, in fact, is happening.  Proposed “utilization rate” and “self-referral” rules intended to cut costs and abuse already, for example, force doctors to order more expensive tests using ionizing-radiation instead of cheaper, safer, and sometimes even more-effective ultrasound tests.  I’ve personally witnessed this, and a good friend of mine (a medical professional himself) has suffered a far more personal medical imaging horror story in which taxpayers got charged ten times the necessary cost, and my friend suffered serious medical complications.

But there’s more to say about where we’re headed.

It’s been said that blood is thicker than water …and that money is thicker than blood.  Your mother is not writing the rules that determine when you get care, and when you die.

We’ve long ago moved past the ideal of patient-centered care, and into cost-accounting for the Common Good. That’s dangerous enough.  But we’re so collectivized in risk (while “privatized” in profit) that everyone has a financial hook in you.  We all want you healthy enough to work and pay your share of the burden.  But just as a transmission can’t tolerate a broken gear, the collective We The People (and the bureaucrats who do our dirtiest deeds) will cast you aside when you’re too weak to work.

Proper pain management is expensive, and doesn’t add to the machine’s bottom line.  Prolonging the life of non-productive cogs doesn’t make sense to the Common Good, does it?

And despite what Obama the Chicago politician promises, doctor-assisted-suicide/euthanasia is already in discussion.  Seriously.

If you’re up for reading 1018 pages, you can read it for yourself.  (I’ll make it easy…read the context before and after page 428 here http://energycommerce.house.gov/Press_111/20090714/aahca.pdf)

And the long run economics are not sane.

For the past hundred years or so, almost every nation on earth has operated on a debt-currency, central banking model that’s, well …a Ponzi Scheme that makes Bernie Madoff look like a petty pickpocket. The true costs of each generation’s debt is deferred into monetary inflation and social re-engineering as a bubble to beat all bubbles.

True, I’d rather go broke on healthcare than on war; and maybe that’s a choice to make. But going broke, in case you haven’t noticed, is a global phenomenon already; and, once again, despite what you’ve been told by the class of people with a 100-year, 100% record of error, we’re just getting started.

The third-party-payer, tax-policy-created healthcare mess we have now must go.  But what I see people debating is whether to put out this fire with dry wood, or gasoline.

As every chapter of human history amply demonstrates, politics isn’t the solution, it’s the problem.

We could fall back into funeral societies if we had to.  Without cars, we could still get around just fine.  I thank God that our politicians haven’t yet proposed food insurance, or a “universal food supply.”

But if we keep letting politicians sell insurance and practice medicine, we’ll see what it’s like to live without health.

RELATED POSTS:
https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2013/10/15/can-politicians-even-define-health-care/
https://wedeclare.wordpress.com/2009/09/23/a-short-history-of-health-care-let-doctors-be-doctors/

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Nothing Else Will Do.

The good news is that more and more people “get it.”  The bad news is that those few of us comprise a tiny, tiny speck.  The rest, even including 90% of those who are in almost every way our allies, have a maddening mind block against the very simple concept of government on a leash of written law.  They somehow cannot understand even asking for Rule of Law under existing constitutions, as written.  An analogy goes something like this:

I’ve just staggered into a pub on the edge of the desert, and as I fall to the floor, I cry out for “WATER!” 

A fellow pushes a napkin into my hand and says, “Is there anything else you need?”

“Thank you for this fine napkin,” I say, “but, I NEED WATER!”

The fellow walks away mumbling something like “…@#$%?! fringe zealot.”

A sympathetic young woman hands me a box of crackers.  “Ignore that guy.  Here you go.”

I smile numbly and dryly croak out, “Thank you, but I’m very, very thirsty.”

A hundred well-intentioned people load me up with chocolate, beef jerky, clothes, a violin, etc., etc., et cetera until, at long last, as I’m about to take my last breath, a bright young Purdue engineering student, the last fellow in the room, and who’s been watching the whole thing with increasing curiosity while hardly touching his glass of St. Bernardus says…

“Hey, wait.”  He seems to have struck an idea.  “Do you mean that you need water?

I’m barely able to speak.  “Yes,” I say, “but, can I finish your beer while you get me some water?…”

Here’s the thing:  When you’re dying of thirst, not even an Alfa Romeo Giulia convertible will help.  You need water.  A dusty bag of concrete mix is not simply unhelpful, it actually hurts as it sits there on your back.

Am I making this plain enough?  I do not want “tax relief.”  I do not want a new law.  I want to hold every level of government to the already written, already law, already proven to work constitutions…as written.

No “interpretations” from the bench.  No caveats, provisos, ifs, ands or buts. 

Our politicians (and the powerful few who control them now) have stolen our constitutionally-defined nation and I want that back.  We only have liberty and self-determination when government stays on its side of the law.

I’d like to hear from you about this.

I don’t know if anybody passes any of it around to others, but I don’t see staggering numbers of people reading this blog.  But I’ve gotten emails and calls (often the not-so-nice ones) from people that I know can’t be reading this blog regularly.  And there are enough of you out there that I’ve never heard from that I’d like to now know how I’m doing in the most important sense, and whether I should bother to continue.  In fact, even if you’re one of the very few who’ve told me “I’m in,” please respond again.  It will determine what happens next, as far as I’m concerned.

This time, contact me at andrewhorning@hotmail.com.

Do it quick.  We’re all dying of thirst, you know.

 

I’m picking up your gauntlett, Paul

It was April 1, but it was no joke.  My friend and feisty fellow constitutionalist Paul Caudell had died.  I had talked with him just a few hours previously, and I didn’t even know he was ill.  When Jerry Titus called me the next day with the news, I was jarred, as if from sleep.  Yes, I was sad.  But I was also angry with myself and feeling inconsolably stupid.  Sure, mortality is a problem.  But wasting life and opportunity and talent is an inexcusable crime. 

You see, here’s the scoop:  I’d given up.  I was flat disgusted with voters, non-voters, citizens and even my allies.  I was feeling hurt and betrayed by people who’d made and broken promises, by all the work and all the expense and all the failure…I was feeling sorry for myself that I lost my political races, lost my social campaigns, and, dang it, lost my business.  I thought it was time for me to not just leave Indiana, but leave behind all the failed hopes. 

Paul spent time in his final hours trying his best to bring me back; not just to Indiana, but to what I’d become all about for the past fifteen years.  I listened to him impatiently.  I was at work and feeling as though I was listening to futility.  I hope I wasn’t rude.  I pray to God that I wasn’t rude…

But then he went and died.  And I was slapped again with a most important and casually dismissed lesson.  Life is precious, and short.

My friends, what are we doing with our lives?

I spent half of my years in the “education system” before starting my life, and my life is probably a little more than half over (I’ve got longevity in my family profile).  Given all our marvelous “time saving” devices and the world’s highest productivity per worker, we should be working two-day weeks on a pleasure cruise through life.  And yet, the long hours away from home, little time spent with kids, and worsening statistics in physical and mental health make me wonder what the heck we think we’re doing to ourselves?  And why?

Why waste so much time and wait so long to start living life?  Why is that life and youth spent in such feverish pursuit of retirement and death?

Well, you should know. 

It’s Tax Time again. 

You know who you’re working for. 

I still want to know, why? 

Our lives are too short and life is such a sweet gift to waste it on politics and the sick pursuit of power over others.  We should get our hands out of our fellows’ wallets and off of their lives and rights, and just enjoy short, sweet life. 

OK, so we admit we’re all socialists now.  The media have been working hard to paint a rosy face on this so you don’t recall the history of Pol Pot, Mao, Stalin, et al.  They’ve been telling us that the best “right” (fascists) are much worse than the worst “left” (socialists), and that we can thank the elite for having saved us from the clutches of those like Hitler, Mussolini, and Tito.

Ours is a culture based and steeped in debt and violence.  The violent taking of taxes, property and rights is how we get nice little park benches and politically-run car companies.  Our debt-based currency/central banking model is why consumerism is good, and saving for your own retirement is bad.  Our debts lead to desperation, the violence leads to more violence, and claiming that it’s all for the greater good of some abstraction like “state” is cave-man ignorant.  It’s all failure, death, pain, and waste of irreplaceable, fleeting life.

Authoritarianism, whether you call it socialism, fascism, serfdom or just Standard Operating Procedure, is stinking foul and self-destructive-dumb.  I’m sick and stupid for thinking I could just give in to it while I still have the breath of life in me.

I am sorry, Paul.  Not that you died, really; I know you’re in a much better place than I am.  But I’m sorry that I wasted time, and you had to call me on it.  I’m sorry that I was hardly there when you called.  I’m sorry that I had given up.

I may not be able to stay in Indiana as you’d wished.  But I now promise that you did not call in vain.  I will not give up. 

“Stoopid Politics” in Fort Wayne

Here’s the YouTube video of the positively brilliant (well, at least fun) “Stoopid Politics” taped in Fort Wayne, Indiana on September 18, 2008.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwR02XqM_G0  pt1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pjVgAfIivA  pt2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3IS5-bLv04  pt3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Bu50DcWhNw pt4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiu152VZAkQ  pt5

 

 

 

 

Huxley Only Imagined…

Well now.  Here’s something interesting

Not only is the Orwellian title attention-grabbing in its own right (and absurd, since experience hath shewn that governments by their nature do the opposite of “save lives.”), but just read this perversity and see if you don’t get cold chills.  Just think about the ramifications – our corrupt, foolish and selfish politicians collecting and owning all DNA data from everybody born in the USA:

  • Our politicians’ record with data security (from both hacking and plain old screwups) is just awful.  Mistakes will be madeHuge ones.  The United Kingdom, our apparent role model, already screwed up with DNA samples, among other things.
  • You think “pre-existing condition” exclusions are bad now!
  • What little good could come out of such a thing is certainly outweighed by sci-fi mischief and Keystone Cops incompetence.

Oh, but it sounds so well-intended and helpful, doesn’t it?  What’s the history of that as applied to politicians?

Anyway, it’s scheduled for debate in the House of Representatives.  Nearly all reps will vote on this without having read a word of it.  They may tell a 20-something legislative aid to read it for them, but most of those starry-eyed future congresscritters haven’t lived long enough to get through a history book and they’ve never heard about such a thing as constitutional limitation of powers.

It’s up to you to tell your reps what’s what and just who they work for.  Brave New World?  It’s still your choice.

Choose wisely.

 

In Politicians We Do NOT Trust

If you’re not a Christian, turn back now.  This blog isn’t for you.  The following is for my brothers and sisters in Christ:

 

I do not pretend to be a good Christian.  I try, and I fail badly, frequently.  If you expect a Christian to be free of doubts or missteps, then I don’t qualify.

Even so, I’d love to speak to church groups all over the state because I’ve got more than just a nit to pick with my Christian family. 

I believe that my “govern government” message is, essentially, to give back to God what is God’s.  American churches have given waaaay too much to Caesar.

There was a time in this state and nation when moral instruction, health, education and welfare were the domain of the church and/or other local voluntary associations.  Politicians had nothing to do with these critical social functions, and Americans were the better for it.

If your barn burnt down, the congregation would build it back up.  If you needed healthcare, chances are you’d get it in a church-run hospital.  Churches founded colleges, ran local schools, built parks, doled out charity (to those that actually needed it!), and cared for the elderly and alone. 

And, critically, the church was a powerful social regulator in that their physical, social relevance also meant that excommunication was a big deal; not just a meaningless dismissal.

Well, we’ve delegated all this to Caesar, his bread and circuses, and his corruptions.  See the results around you?  Not so pretty.

I’m just about done with many Christians’ politician-friendly “interpretation” of the tribute penny story found in three books of the New Testament: “Then give to Caesar what is Caesar’s and unto God what is God’s.” (Luke 20: 26)

Some Christians think this means that the money isn’t all that important, or that, as in Luke 18:25, you’re much better off without it anyway.  It’s true that you can’t serve two masters.

But Christ himself pointed us in an entirely different direction through Matthew 17:24-27.  The key phrases are, ““Then the children are exempt,” Jesus said to him,” and “…so that we may not offend them…give it to them for my tax and yours.”

Why do I think that’s the key?

Because, first of all, Christ Himself says that the children of God are exempt from Caesar’s tax.  Second, because they’re paying taxes in this case just for appearances sake.
And,
according to just about everywhere in the Bible, human Kings represent our turn from god and toward human idols (see I Samuel: 8, Acts 12: 21-23), and everything and everyone, belongs to God!

Including Caesar.

So what belongs to Caesar if EVERYTHING belongs to God?
I’ll not write up a long description of proof texts, but if you get curious, consider Deut. 8:17-18, Deuteronomy 10:14, 1 Chronicles 29:11, 1 Chronicles 29: 14,  Psalm 24:1, Job 41:11,  Haggai 2:8, Psalm 50:10-12 and Psalm 100:3.

And with all the talk of money, we mustn’t forget what’s more important:

“You are not your own. You were bought at a price” – 1 Cor. 6:19-20 NIV.

And did we Christians somehow miss that the early Christians were killed in droves and in horrible ways for defying Caesar and spreading the Word of God? 

I don’t believe Christians are called to be garnishes on Caesar’s dinner plate.  We are to be beacons to God’s Covenant and Kingdom.  We’re supposed to exemplify and point to the truth, not act like doormats.
Yes, some might say, but what about Romans 13?
Yes; about that.
I think we’ve been badly misinterpreting that one too.
The rest of Romans is obviously written to Jews living in Rome who (apparently) needed reminders about Temple discipline (remember, not only was the Word sharper than a two-edged sword, but there was also Temple Tax and punishment like lashings, stonings and such).  Jews had a theocratic government, and Paul was exhorting them to remember that.
I understand people think that  Paul suddenly interrupts the chapter to discuss civil government when the rest was about church/Temple/faith.
“Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers… ”
Is that just Nero, really?  

The Roman ruler who burned Christians in his garden like tiki torches and killed all but one of the Apostles (who died opposing Caesar, remember) was not who who Paul referred to as “…the minister of God to thee for good!”
To read that any other way seems like a really odd interruption and jarring sidebar to what is otherwise a very cohesive argument.
And what about I Samuel 8:6-20?
Did God really intend for us to bow to human kings?  Where in the Bible are the examples of Good Kings?

Anyway, today, this is the sovereign state of Indiana (Article 4, Section 16 of the Indiana Constitution), a member state of the United States of America, where we have the authority to choose our leaders, and by extension, our way of life.  Christians have, like the ever-stiff-necked ancient Israelites, rejected God’s Word, His laws, His example and His Blessings.  Do I need to remind you how nations are judged for such things?

There is a corollary to “In God We Trust.”  It’s “In Politicians We Do NOT Trust.” 

If I get my way, churches will stop fussing over their precious tax status, and start doing here in the USA what they know they must do in missions abroad: Spread the Good News, while rolling up shirt sleeves and serving their fellow sinners in ways that matter in every day life.

One way or another, by wise pre-planning, or by grim necessity with our economy collapsing around us, you’d better get ready…

Stealing and Abusing Children!?!?

Who: Andy Horning, Honk 4 Kids and several victims of CPS 

What: Press Conference on the crimes of CPS (called DCS here in Indiana)

When: Friday, 11 July, 2008 at 3pm

Where: 920 Laurel street, Indianapolis

www.HorningForGovernor.com

 

 

A Horrible Wrong

 

The genius of our nations’ founders was that they understood the danger of politics, and kept it on a leash.  They devised a power-limiting scheme of divided and opposed powers, with legislative, executive and judicial powers clearly written into constitutions – with all other powers excluded. 

Key to the powers denied was that political violence may not be unleashed without due process, warrant and properly defined powers.

Modern bureaucracies, like ancient criminal gangs or minor kingdoms, operate by their own rules.  And CPS, or the euphemistically named Child Protective Services, is among the most barbaric.

Sold as an agency of protection for children, it is anything but.  It is, in fact, a lucrative bounty scheme that not only gets tax dollars for each child stolen, but has it’s own judicial, executive and legislative agents.

No due process.  No warrants.  Nothing but the thinnest justification for sucking children into a system with horrible statistics in sexual and physical abuse as well as very high death rates.

Several victims will be on hand, and the facts will be laid bare.  It’s not just polygamists who’ve been wronged by the hundreds…

###

 

Andrew Horning, Libertarian for Governor

Freedom, IN 47431

andrewhorning@hotmail.com

http://www.horningforgovernor.com/

There is no free lunch.

The good news is that there are enough liberty and justice loving patriots out there to take back our rights and leash politicians to the constitutions again.  And these patriots have enough money and votes to do it in one single election cycle.  …Overwhelming victory.  …All at once.

The bad news is that they’ve been sitting on their money and wasting their votes.

You get what you pay for.  There’s no free lunch.  You get what you vote for; there’s no excuse.

There are plenty of people who pay big money for political favors and twisted laws.  Special deals for special people.  You pay-to-play.  Those with the gold make the rules.  Right? 

But who is willing to pay for a fair deal?  How many will sacrifice their time and money without any expectation of reciprocal favors?  Who, in other words, will actually oppose injustice and failure?

It’s the simplest math to see why taxation, litigation and regulation are growing like bacteria.  Evil reigns when good people sit on their wallets.  

I’m running for Governor of Indiana because the Governor has only one legitimate job – to execute the laws of the state.  And the laws of Indiana are based solely on the authority of the Constitution of Indiana, a contract I have actually read.  Repeatedly.  I know what it says, and I know what life would be like if only we enforced its restrictions on politicians.

Life would be sweet.  Life would work.  We’d have the prosperity, opportunity, security and liberty due to us by law.  Cheap, plentiful healthcare, unequalled education, unregulated success and happiness are our legal rights.

Yet I am the only gubernatorial candidate who wants this for you.  Only I would actually keep the oath of office to support both the constitutions of Indiana and the United States of America as is constitutionally required. 

Read the constitution yourself.  It’s on my website (it’s my Platform), and I’ve excerpted key parts in the following pages.  Read it.  Then decide how much it’s worth to you to get it back.   

Make checks payable to: Horning for Congress, 7851 Pleasant Hill Road, Freedom, IN 47431.

Oh, just quit it.

This isn’t a blog.  It is just a quick note; so I’m not going back on my promise not to blog anymore:

Presidents do not “age” any more than anybody else does.  In fact it’s typically the opposite to the degree that wealth and power make for better healthcare.

Since GWB started leading us over the precipice, I’ve aged a whole lot more than he has.  Everybody I know has aged at least 8 years in the last 8 years, and GWB looks just fine.

He’s a little more gray; I’m a lot more gray.

So quit feeling sorry about the stress and pressure of presidency.  You should worry more about your neighbor.

Published in: on January 8, 2008 at 6:09 pm  Comments (2)  
Tags: , , ,

America Was Great…

“America is great because she is good, and if America ever ceases to be good, she will cease to be great.”  This saying is typically attributed to that pro-American Frenchman, Alexis de Tocqueville.  It’s an interesting saying, but de Tocqueville never said it.  Also, the saying itself is only half-true. 

Americans have always been humans; not so different from all those sinners in France.  A seed of truth in the quote is that there was a time when Americans had to act hat-tipping, help-your-neighbor civil.  There was a time when Americans acted better than they were.

During de Tocqueville’s visit to the USA (1831), and in fact through the hundred-some years until Income Tax, central banking and the New Deal (as opposed to the Best-Ever Deal) changed all the rules, the church was the only Department of Health, Education and Welfare – even in our biggest cities.  Churches ran hospitals, schools, welfare and social cooperative programs.  It was church mothers who’d helped rear our young.  It was church fathers and sons who’d helped at planting time.  It was church leaders who’d opposed slavery and unscrupulous businesses, and it was the church that served as FEMA for natural disasters. 

So excommunication meant the loss of key social services …if your barn burnt down, there’d be no church-based barn-raising to build it back up. 

The only alternatives to churches in those days were fraternal societies/clubs that also operated on a voluntary basis, and which also operated by strict moral code.

In other words, to get social services and insurance from nothing more than a voluntary collection plate, Americans had to behave. 

That was not such a bad thing!  Per capita crime rates in cities (many of which were more densely populated a hundred years ago) were only a tiny fraction of what we have today even in rural areas.  Murder was rare, big news when even kids walked around with firearms and it was perfectly legal to use your machine gun with a silencer (before you dress up and go off to church).

But now, instead of a voluntary tithe, Americans apparently prefer to give up half their wealth (actually more by recent estimates; and 22% more of their time just since 1979!) to a government that itself has neither interest nor experience in morality.  The combination of tax laws that gag preachers and policies that replace traditional church roles have made churches socially irrelevant; and have made politicians our new gods.

Fortunately for some, these politicians are for sale.  Unfortunately for the rest of us, our politicians have been bought.  Such corruption of power is as ancient as Adam and as unavoidable as decay. 

Our nation became great only by constitutionally limiting the size and scope of corrupt government.  That was the Old Deal…politicians on a leash.  And that old deal is still the newest deal in human history.

 But since the “New Deal” (actually a very ancient, pre-Hammurabi deal), we’ve devolved into more regulation, taxation and litigation than all other nations on earth …combined.  And we must compete with nations that have far less of all of that.

There are no unions or EPA or OSHA or FDA or patent enforcement or minimum wage in China, yet we buy things made there, right? Canada and Europe remove their VAT and GST taxes before shipping them to our stores, and we suck it all up, right?   

So while we pat ourselves on the back for the USA’s “progressive” politics, we’re promoting slavery, unregulated pollution, disease, oppressive regimes and powerful enemies all over the world.  When we buy shoes from Portugal, medical equipment from Germany or telecom service from France (Sacré bleu!), we’re firing Americans.

See?  We don’t even act good now (hey, I’ve seen how y’all drive).   

Of course I suggest we try III John 1:11: “Beloved, do not imitate evil but imitate good.”  If that’s the best we could do, fine; because it’s the best that’s ever been done. 

But if we don’t cut our politicians, their regulations, litigation and taxation down to competitive (and, by the way, legal) size, we will not only cease to be great; we may just cease to be.