No More Speed Traps Until…

Who: Andy Horning

What: Polishing the Badges of State Power

When: Thursday, August 28 at 6pm

Where: FOP Lodge 100 - 4711 Middle Road, Jeffersonville, IN 47130

Contact: Andy Horning; http://www.horningforgovernor.com/

 

 

Restoring Legal and Moral Authority

 

Jeffersonville, Indiana -

I apologize for the late notice.  But don’t let the impossibility of attending this event bother you; I’ll go anywhere anytime to talk about this with anyone.  Call me on the phone.  Show up at my door.  This is important.

- Because our crime rates are rising…within our own government!  Judicial misconduct, bad cops, jury tampering/abuse, school building scandals (e.g., AEPA/Tremco no bid scheme), and of course lawmakers are breaking laws at every level and in every significant way.  As our government has broken the laws that protect citizens from oppression and war; and as citizens lose their jobs, homes and even lives for no good reason; it’s time to take a stand for justice and decency. 

Our government surrendered the moral authority to lay traps for decent citizens when politicians have trampled their own legal authority -the state and federal constitutions. 

I propose we stop issuing unmarked cars (like hot rod Mustang Cobras) at once.  I propose we stop entrapping and extorting citizens with speed traps and “infraction deferral” programs until our crime rates (civilian and government crime) are substantially reduced.

We must stop putting our police into ever-more adversarial roles against our citizens.  We must allow them to protect and serve instead.  And we absolutely must restore respect for law and order by policing our police and by governing our own government at last.

 

 

 

###

Andrew Horning, Libertarian for Governor

Freedom, IN 47431

andrewhorning@hotmail.com

http://www.horningforgovernor.com/

Cry me a river, John

John McCain says the media isn’t giving him a fair shake.  He has no idea what it’s like to run as a Libertarian.  But he also has no idea what it’s like to apply for a real job with a real interview.

What sort of press does any candidate (even Obama) get these days?  When will we hear answers to the most basic, important questions that should be asked of every politician:

Are there any laws that politicians must obey without exceptions?  Are there any rights that cannot be violated?  Is there any property that cannot be seized?  How much taxation is enough?  What is the value of a human life, and who decides?  What is the valid role of government?  What is none of politicians’ business?  And are your answers in writing somewhere?

How about we just stop that silly “two party system” fiction and start asking these critical questions?  You know we need to. 

Right now.

In the 2008 gubernatorial race, there is only one candidate even running for the constitutional office of Indiana Governor.  This man has already proposed overhauling state government.  He has already proposed standing up to D.C. to demand federalism.  Of course he’s proposed eliminating personal property tax.  He has also already proposed eliminating CPS/DCS, phasing out public schools in favor of Common Schools (as is constitutionally required), stopping I-69, and in general, restoring what works and rejecting what’s failing in Indiana.  And he also did this when he ran for Governor in 2000. 

He was right on the facts and issues then, and he’s right on the facts and issues now.

Voters have heard none of this from their eyes and ears in the democratic process, the media.  Voters rely on the media’s imprimatur of legitimacy, and yet all they hear about is Mitch Daniels’ money and incumbency, Jill Long Thompson’s “Green Jobs,” and that nebulous charge of “negative campaigning” that marks every race.

…The poor voters don’t know what they’re missing. 

…Or what the choices actually are in November. 

That’s just not right. 

Let’s all do better this time.

Another “I told you so”

I know.  Nobody likes to hear “I told you so.”  But I’m a candidate for public office, and I’m supposed to toot my horn about such things as, well, being right.

The price of gas is more in the news now than it was four years ago when I wrote this press release (that never made the news, of course):

Price Gouging, or Bad Planning?

It wasn’t so long ago that Democrats wanted European-like prices for gasoline.  They reasoned that if gasoline were more expensive, then more people would ride bicycles, walk, or use public transportation and, in general, conserve this energy resource as if it were finite.  Expensive gas would promote the development of alternative fuels and energy sources, and probably fuel a new wave of technological breakthroughs.  While we may not like the idea of expensive gas, the long-term reasoning is actually pretty sound.

Sadly, Democratic politicians abandoned this reasoning when they lifted gasoline taxes before an election (the late Governor O’Bannon in 2000), suggested that we tap into our Strategic Oil Reserves (several Democrats on state and federal levels), or (as Rep. Julia Carson had done this past June) call for an investigation of the oil industry at the first hint of rising gasoline prices.

Ms. Carson has voted for federal price controls, though this policy has proven disastrous every time, and in every country, and every market that it has been tried.  Ironically, she’s also voted against fuel alternative incentives and raising CAFE standards, two common liberal rallying points.

Ms. Carson isn’t a policy wonk, to be sure.  But her ideas on energy consumption are inconsistent, illogical and counterproductive.  Without better representation in this key policy area, and soon, our future looks grim.

There hasn’t been a new oil refinery built in the USA since 1976.  So instead of doing the math of supply and demand with our own resources, we turned to global markets that have their own agenda in global politics.   This has made us dependent upon foreign intervention as an energy policy, and raises the possibility that third-world nations may soon pass us in terms of energy efficiency and robust delivery/point of use generation…and this could mean even further erosion of USA industry and technological prowess.

We’ve built our cities for cars and cheap gas; so we have seas of parking lots and miles and miles of ugly boxes we call buildings.  Such unsightly, inefficient building lowers our quality of life, steals our leisure time, and makes us a nation of red-faced road-ragers.  Oh, and of course, like most federal policies of the last forty years, this lack of clear-sighted policy has cost us tens of thousands of jobs.

We must do better.  We’re past-due for some forward-thinking in energy and transportation policy, and I will make free-market investment, innovation and infrastructure development a high priority on day one.

###

Economics is to Politics, as Gasoline is to a Match

Politicians don’t make the discoveries and breakthroughs that make our lives safer, longer, and more comfortable.  Free-market, free-thinking tinkerers, inventors, scientists and entrepreneurs do that.

We know that government doesn’t build cars, nice houses and stylish shoes.  It doesn’t make espresso, or bicycle helmets, or leather sofas, or medicines.  It doesn’t make jumbo jets, computers or portable DVD players.

Private businesses are launching spacecraft and building global communications systems.  Doctors can, without political intervention, open up a failing human body, replace the heart, and allow a life to go on.

And yet, we’ve somehow convinced ourselves that without government, there’d be no roads.  Some of us apparently think that without government subsidies, there’d be no football, no art, no charity, no business, no schools.

While we don’t utter the word anymore, there is a name for this thinking.  We used to call it socialism, and Americans used to fight it body and spirit.  Now we whimper and beg for it.  So we’re getting it good and hard. 

Can we re-think this? 

It wasn’t so long ago that Democrats wanted European-like prices for gasoline.  They reasoned that if gasoline were more expensive, then more people would ride bicycles, walk, demand and use public transportation, and in general, conserve this energy resource as if it were finite.  Expensive gas would promote the development of alternative fuels and energy sources, and probably fuel a new wave of technological breakthroughs.  While we may not like the idea of expensive gas, the long-term economic reasoning is actually sound.

Curiously, Democratic politicians abandoned this reasoning when they started crying about “global warming.”  They then lifted gasoline taxes before an election (the late Governor O’Bannon in 2000), suggested that we tap into our Strategic Oil Reserves (several Democrats on state and federal levels), or (as Rep. Julia Carson had done in 2003) call for an investigation of the oil industry at the first hint of rising gasoline prices.

Of course Republicans got in on this, too.  Republicans do what Democrats only talk about.

OK, so there hasn’t been a new oil refinery built in the USA since 1976.  Americans have no objection to foreign oil drilling, but will not tolerate it at home.  So instead of doing the math of supply and demand with our own resources, we turned to global markets that have their own agenda in global politics.

This has been disastrous on several fronts.  First, we’ve become dependent upon militarism as an energy policy.  Second, our lack of energy policy foresight has raised the possibility that third-world nations may soon pass us in terms of energy efficiency and robust delivery/point of use generation …and this could mean even further erosion of USA industry and technological prowess.

Third, we’ve built our cities for cars and cheap gas; so we have seas of parking lots and miles and miles of ugly boxes we call buildings.  Such unsightly, inefficient building lowers our quality of life, steals our leisure time, and makes us a nation of red-faced road-ragers.  Oh, and of course, like most federal policies of the last forty years, this lack of clear-sighted policy has cost us tens of thousands of jobs.

What is the best policy? 

Get politicians out of our marketplaces, and let businessmen, scientists, engineers and of course, entrepreneurs, do what they do best…fill needs to our mutual satisfaction.

That is, after all, what the free market is: voluntary transactions that serve everybody’s needs and even wants.  And let’s not forget the opposite of that: power-mad poohbahs with guns who think they know best. 

We have a word for the narcissistic napoleons who destroy nations and lives; it’s “politicians.”

An Interesting Exercise. Or two.

I’ll not give you any links, because I think this is a quick and easy search, and I don’t want you to think I’m unfairly prearranging an outcome:

  1. Look up the meaning and practice of fascism; only, don’t use the words of enemies, look up what fascists said about themselves.  Mussolini coined the term “fascism,” and he wrote an awful lot on the subject.
  2. Look up socialism/communism by the same rules.  Look up what Marx and Engels said.  Look up Friendly American Socialists like Eugene Debs. 
  3. Now, consider what you know of your own government and make a list of differences.

…Is this last part hard?  Does number 3 make you say thing like, “well…” “ummm…” and “you just can’t compare what’s happening today with…”??

 

Optional, extra credit exercise:

  1. Think about all the areas in which you believe government really does need to play a part.  Examples may be road-building, schools, national defense.
  2. Now, replace the word “government” with “corrupt lifelong politicians who also happen to be ignorant,” and think about number 1 again.

Have a nice day!

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